lundi 31 août 2015

How to Track a MoneyGram Money Order

MoneyGram is an ideal way to send money because payment is always guaranteed for the recipient and the sender's banking information is never exposed. If you have recently sent someone a MoneyGram money order for any reason, it is a good idea to learn how to track MoneyGram money orders so you can ensure that your recipient received and cashed it.

Steps

Locating Your Serial Number

  1. Keep your receipt and stub. When you fill out your MoneyGram money order, there will be a stub at the top that can be easily removed from the money order. Before sending the money order, remove this stub along the perforated line. This stub will act as your proof of purchase. It also contains the money order number.
    Track a MoneyGram Money Order Step 1 Version 5.jpg
    • Keep a copy of the money order, too. This helps you track the money order and will be needed if you have to report a lost or stolen money order.
    • Put the stub, receipt, and copy in a safe place that is easy to access, like a file folder in your desk, a safe, or filing cabinet.
    • Make sure the documents can't be found or seen by other people. They might have sensitive information on them.
    • Remember where you've put these documents. Write down the locations if you have to.
  2. Locate the MoneyGram serial number. All MoneyGrams have a unique identification number specifically used for tracking money orders. The MoneyGram order number is typically located on the left edge of the MoneyGram stub. The number will be in red or black ink. You will find the number in the upper right corner near the date of purchase.[1]
    Track a MoneyGram Money Order Step 2 Version 5.jpg
    • Write down your serial number. This can help you track your MoneyGram if you lose your receipt or need to shred it.
    • Keep it written down without identifying what it is. Put it by your computer, phone, in your wallet, or desk for safekeeping.
    • Give the number to the person you are sending money to so they can also track the MoneyGram.
  3. Fill out a Lost Serial Number form if you lose the number. The MoneyGram website provides a printable form to fill out so you can retrieve the number. Having MoneyGram track down your lost number will cost a $40 non-refundable fee and take 6-8 weeks.
    Track a MoneyGram Money Order Step 3 Version 5.jpg
    • You should only do this if you have lost your stub with the serial number on it. Even then, don't request a serial number replacement unless you need the number for something, like a refund or claim. If the money order arrives without a problem, you won't need the number, so don't waste your money or time requesting a new one.
    • This service must be done through the mail. You can't fill out the form over the phone or on the internet. You must print out a copy of the form and mail it in.
    • If you don't know whether or not the money order was cashed, this service may not be useful for you.

Tracking Your MoneyGram

  1. Call MoneyGram. To track a MoneyGram order, you must call them. Their toll-free tracking number is 1-800-542-3590.[2] This is a free service.
    Track a MoneyGram Money Order Step 4 Version 5.jpg
    • This number is an automated system, which is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
    • You cannot track MoneyGrams online.
  2. Enter the money order serial number. When you call the MoneyGram tracking line, you will have to provide the money order serial number.[3] Listen to the instructions, and then using the number pad, enter the serial number exactly as it is listed on the stub.
    Track a MoneyGram Money Order Step 5 Version 5.jpg
    • If you make a mistake, you can re-enter the number.
    • If you encounter difficulties, check that you have the correct serial number.
  3. Enter the amount of the money order. After entering your money order serial number, the automated service will prompt you to enter the dollar amount of the money order.[4] You cannot track the money order without knowing the exact amount of the money order.
    Track a MoneyGram Money Order Step 6 Version 5.jpg
    • Make sure you enter the exact amount of the money order. If you use an approximate amount, the automated system will not be able to locate your order.
    • Double check the amount if you are having any problems.
  4. Listen for the status of your money order. After entering the exact amount, listen to any other automated instructions. If you have entered the correct serial number and dollar amount, the system should tell you when the money order was cashed. [5]
    Track a MoneyGram Money Order Step 7 Version 5.jpg
    • If the money order has not been cashed yet, the system will inform you.
  5. Contact the recipient. If you want to follow up with your money order, contact the person or company to whom you sent the money order. They can tell you whether or not they received it and when they plan on cashing it.
    Track a MoneyGram Money Order Step 8 Version 5.jpg
    • Some companies or people may receive the money order but wait to cash it. If this is the case, you want to contact the recipient before requesting a claim or refund on the money order.
  6. Wait at least two weeks. Since you are sending your money order through the mail, wait at least 2 weeks for the money order to arrive. If it has been less than 2 weeks, the money order may not have had time to arrive to the location yet. Wait at least 3 weeks before submitting any claim forms.
    Track a MoneyGram Money Order Step 9 Version 5.jpg
  7. Submit a claim form. If it has been over 2-3 weeks and your recipient still has not received the money order, you can fill out a MoneyGram claim card. This claim form has to be mailed to MoneyGram and cannot be completed via the phone or on the internet. To have the claim processed, you must include a non-refundable $15 fee. It may take 30-60 days to process your claim.
    Track a MoneyGram Money Order Step 10 Version 5.jpg
    • If the money order has not been cashed, you will be issued a refund. To receive a refund, the claim card must be filled out completely, including your signature at the bottom.
    • If the money order has been cashed, a photocopy of the money order will be sent to you.[6]
    • Incomplete or illegible claim forms can delay or prevent your claim from getting processed.
  8. Request a photocopy of the cashed money order. If your money order has been cashed, you can request a photocopy to find out who cashed it. You will receive a copy of the money order which includes both the front and back, showing who endorsed it and cashed it.[7] You can request a photocopy through the claim card. This process costs a non-refundable $15 fee and can take 30-65 days.
    Track a MoneyGram Money Order Step 11 Version 5.jpg
    • If your money order has been cashed but your recipient says they never received it, request a photocopy. Once you have proof that someone other than your recipient cashed the money order, contact MoneyGram customer service.

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source How to of the Day http://ift.tt/1D7DhWV

How to Throw a Frisbee

For some, learning how to throw a Frisbee may seem harder than it looks. This article will teach you to throw a Frisbee using a basic backhand technique.

Steps

Learning the Throwing Motion

  1. Grip the Frisbee in your fist. Your thumb should be on top of the Frisbee, your index finger should be against the edge and your remaining fingers should touch the underside.

  2. Stand with your feet at a 90-degree angle to your target. Your right foot should be in front if you are right-handed, and your left foot should be in front if you are left-handed.

  3. Curl your wrist slightly back towards your body as you hold the Frisbee. Your elbow should be pointing up and outward.

  4. Point the Frisbee at your target. Usually you are throwing your Frisbee to another person, so you will want to aim your Frisbee so that your partner can catch it easily.

  5. Move your arm forward quickly. Straighten your arm and, as your arm is almost fully extended, flick your wrist and release the Frisbee out towards the target.

    • Your wrist should snap with a spring-like motion.
    • Release the Frisbee at different heights for different affects during the throw. For the most stability, try releasing it just above your belly button.
  6. Release your Frisbee with the appropriate amount of power. Too much power or too little will cause the Frisbee to hit the ground, wobble or fly wildly.

Fine Tune Your Throw

  1. Practice your throwing technique. Practice will perfect your own technique and give you a feel for how the Frisbee interacts with air currents.

    • Try throwing the Frisbee between two cones with a friend
    • Try throwing the Frisbee at a target. For example, you could throw the Frisbee into a box or toward a tree.
  2. Increase your power. During your throwing action, shift your weight from your back foot to your front foot while twisting your hips. For more stability, step outwards with your dominant foot.

  3. Get the details right. Remember these details while fine-tuning your throw.

    • Concentrate on your wrist snap. This action will add spin to your throw, which will make it more accurate and will keep the Frisbee from wobbling
    • Bend your elbow during your toss. The elbow bend will also improve your accuracy while increasing the power of your throw.
    • Keep the disc level as you throw. Imagine that the Frisbee is a dish of ice cream and that you are trying not to spill your dessert.

Video

Tips

  • Dogs love to catch Frisbees. If you have a canine pal, get a spare dog Frisbee that is softer and lighter to share some fun times together. That way, you can avoid having tooth marks in your better quality Frisbee.
  • When you let go of the frisbee, your pointer finger should be pointing towards your target.
  • Choose a high-quality Frisbee. A good Frisbee contains durable materials, and you can feel its weight and thickness in your hand. A low-quality Frisbee will not last for a long time and may crack easily.
  1. Find a suitable place to throw the Frisbee. You need a space in which you can run a fair distance without running into obstacles

Warnings

  • Be careful when you are throwing your Frisbee in a neighborhood. Frisbees easily fly onto roofs, and they can also damage windows.

Things You'll Need

  • Frisbee
  • Open area such as a sports field, a beach, a park
  • Friend to catch your throws

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source How to of the Day http://ift.tt/YHrqxG

How to Start a Horse Breeding Farm

Starting a horse breeding farm isn't something to take on lightly. In fact, this article can only introduce you to some of the more important things you need to be aware of, as you'd need to read an entire tone of information to cover all the requirements for a successful horse breeding operation, including how to assess your own suitability to undertake such an enterprise. Nevertheless, there are some basic principles and essentials that will help to guide your decision to start a horse breeding farm and will help you to decide whether this is the right thing for you to do. Saddle up and learn what's involved!

Steps

Is this the business for you?

  1. Make sure that you not only want to start a horse farm, but also that you're not blinkered to the challenges that you will face, including financial, physical, and emotional consequences. If you've owned one or more horses, you'll already be aware that there is a lot of work involved and that it's a rather expensive undertaking. Breeding horses will increase the work, the expenses, the worry and the long-term attachment to your business in ways that simply owning a horse doesn't really prepare you for. You will also have to immerse yourself in such things as marketing, detailed and reliable checking and referencing of the horses' background and breeding information and keeping track of all your income and expenses, meaning that you're going to experience a lot of administrative input on top of the horse care, as a business operator. A brief overview of the advantages and disadvantages of turning your hobby into a business will help you to decide if this is what you really want to do. Here are some suggested pluses and minuses to help you form your own list:
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    • Advantages: If you love horses, working in a business that involves them means that you'll be doing what you love, often an important element of a successful small business. Moreover, if you're already knowledgeable, you'll be well ahead of others starting a business from scratch in products, goods or animals about which they know nothing. Some other advantages include:
      • The opportunity to ride horses regularly
      • A chance to be around your horses constantly
      • Caring for foals
      • Selling horses for more money––while optional if you're operating as a stud farm, this tends to be a necessity to prevent overcrowding, to remove horses that aren't getting along and to keep your business well funded. This can be a source of pride in knowing that your horses are going elsewhere but it can also be a very emotional side of the business
      • Operating as a stud farm, offering the services of your stallion(s), offering your mares where appropriate and perhaps offering boarding and foal raising facilities. This can be a very rewarding aspect both financially and as a source of pride but it's also fraught with the potential for liability and worry.
    • Disadvantages: There are numerous disadvantages to owning a horse breeding farm, including start-up costs for land, stables, equipment, feed and the horses. You will need to have quality breeding horses, or risk nobody wanting to purchase the horses, and this initial outlay can be very costly. You won't necessarily see a good return for your cash outlay for several years, meaning that you'll have to run a tight business and make do for a while. Other disadvantages include:
      • The constant need for high quality, expensive horse food; you might consider whether it's possible to grow your own or to buy as a co-operative with other horse owners in the local area.
      • The requirement for adequate equipment, supplies, and tack, which will quickly add up financially. When starting up, make use of sales, discounts from belonging to professional organizations and used items through auctions and other sales. If you're smart and lucky, you might find a horse breeding business that is closing down and has stock to sell off (of both the product and animal kind).
      • Increased regular vet visits––more horses means more potential for problems, including general health maintenance such as deworming and shots, everyday injuries through to disease and major injuries. Emergency treatment will also need to be accounted for as a possibility at least once a year, so set aside adequate funds and plan good insurance coverage.
      • Increased regular farrier visits will be required to ensure that all of the horses' hooves are maintained in top condition; presentation of breeding horses is your customer's reassurance of quality, so you cannot skimp on this, ever.
      • Increased workload and responsibility. It's self evident that more horses means more work, including more mucking out stalls.
      • Need for ongoing legal and financial advice to ensure that you won't be out of pocket for things out of your control or for a poorly run budget.
  2. Gain experience and knowledge on how to work with horses. It is extremely important that you know how to properly handle, care for, and understand horses. You don't have to be able to ride a horse, but if you can't, then you'll need to hire someone who can to keep the horses in shape and well trained as most people will only buy horses that have been "broken in" for riding (foals being the exception). In fact, buyers may consider it a little odd that you run a horse breeding operation without actually knowing how to ride a horse, so unless there is an issue of disability involved, it's recommended that you learn to ride. And just in case you're a bit green with horses, here are some skills you should have set in place beforehand:
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Locating your business

  1. This size should be determined by what you can afford but also by what horses need–-plenty of space to run and plenty of space to separate horses that shouldn't be breeding at particular times or who shouldn't be together, such as two horses that don't get along. Also, check zoning regulations before considering any property, to make sure a horse breeding operation is an acceptable use. Your best bet is to buy fertile land with lots of green grass/hay/alfalfa; otherwise, your expenses will increase because you need to bring in lots of feed. Local agricultural organizations will often test land for you to help you identify the species of grass growing on it, and any other relevant issues such as the mineral content of the soil. If you plan on keeping horses on pasture all year round, the grass needs to be rich in vitamins and minerals and non-toxic to horses. It also needs to grow back quickly! On the other hand, if your climate means that the horses need to be kept indoors over winter, you'll need suitable barn accommodation with easy mucking out facilities and at least a small outside area for exercising during the warmest part of cold days.
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    • Horses need approximately 1000 square feet per horse. More space is always better than less.
    • You'll need at least two separated areas of land, one for the stallion(s) and the other area for the mares. If you have more than one stallion, you'll need more separate areas, as keeping two stallions in the same pasture is not a good idea in most cases, especially since farm lots rarely replicate the wide ranges of wild horses. Moreover, there is a distinct need for rotating pasture, to allow pasture to recover and to release the horses onto fresh pasture regularly, meaning that you will need more pasture than you might first think.
    • It would be preferable if the land you bought already had a barn, outdoor shed (for your horses in winter), a place to park a horse trailer, and any other necessities. If not, you'll find the costs add up very quickly on top of the land purchase.
    • Ask about the water supply––look for a guaranteed, quality supply, where there is a plentiful and sufficient amount of water. Creeks, ponds, dams and the like are good sources of water, but you'll need to ensure that algae growth isn't an issue in the warmer months. On the other hand, too much water can water log the pasture, ruining its feeding potential and causing problems for the horses walking in puddles and muddy conditions.
  2. Search the pasture and remove all sharp and otherwise dangerous rocks, barbed wire, and poisonous plants that could hurt a horse.
    • Check for holes in the pasture. It would be best if there weren't any gophers or other animals/rodents which dig holes in the ground, because if a horse (or any large mammal, for that matter) steps in these at a fast pace, there is a risk of severe injury. If there are holes, consider whether measures to eliminate the cause of the holes is viable or not.
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    • Areas with snakes need to be checked for snake habitat in the pasture. Snakes and horses don't mix, so by reducing the habitat preferences of snakes, you can reduce the potential for snakes hanging about around. Some things that may help are not having wood/log piles, junk heaps, and any other such place that encourages rodent breeding, which attracts snakes.
      1580736 4b2 1.jpg
    • Check for possible toxic plants. Trees are an important shade source but they can also be a liability if they produce toxic berries, seeds or leaves. Identify plants on a property using a field guide before making a purchase decision. You might be able to remove an offending tree but a whole copse of trees or a pasture filled with weeds starts to be a lot of work without a guarantee that you've found all possible toxic plants. To see a list of common plants poisonous to horses, see http://ift.tt/1JGofqi.
      1580736 4b3 1.jpg
    • See How to prepare a pasture for horses.

Equipping your business with the essentials

  1. Equip the land and built areas with a barn, water supply, outdoor sheds (for horses in pasture), and any other necessities.
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    • Shelter is essential for hot, sunny days during the warmer months. If you rely on trees as part of the shade, ensure that they're not toxic. Trees also need protection from chewing, including removal of chewed branches to prevent infection to the trees. A shade shed should be built in pastures lacking in shade trees. This can be as simple as a high roof on four posts or a shed with three sides; it can be made very inexpensively.
    • Orient any shelter so that it heads away from prevailing cold winds and to make the most of cooling summer breezes (usually south facing in the northern hemisphere, vice versa in the southern hemisphere).
    • If you do need to build before starting the business, get firm timelines and signed deals as to costs of building. Most building projects inevitably cost more than initially thought. Moreover, get a variety of estimates rather than relying on just one builder. And only use registered builders affiliated with a recognized building association.
  2. Provide your land with good quality fencing. This is extremely important, as you don't want your horses escaping or getting hurt on the fencing. Good fencing costs money but it's not worth skimping because injuries and loss can amount to a lot more than money outlaid on suitable fencing from the beginning.
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    • The best fencing of all would be a tall, thick, and wide hedge with a wooden fence in front of it. However, as most people don't have the time to do this, a good quality wooden fence works just fine, as does metal bars. Wooden fencing comes in many kinds, such as post-and-board, post-and-rail, etc. and needs to be maintained. Using wood that is non-toxic and enduring, you should expect a good 15 to 20 years life from a well-cared for wooden fence. The trick is in maintaining it––borers can attack such fencing and bored horses like to chew it. Keep a regular eye for insect damage of wooden fencing and replace it regularly; as for chewing, you can try running an electric wire along the wood to condition the horses into leaving the fence alone. Many people resort to vinyl coated white wooden fencing because it needs less painting maintenance.
    • Another option is electric fencing. Provided it is properly earthed and made with quality wire using at least three to four rows, it is a cost-effective and usually safe solution. Most horses will shy away from it after a few shocks. However, sometimes it can scare a horse enough to destroy the fence, so care needs to be taken with particularly wild or frisky horses.
    • Do not ever use hog wire fencing for horses. Horses (and other wildlife like deer) can accidentally get their legs caught in it.
    • Barbed wire should not be an option for keeping horses. Barbed wire was designed for cows, not horses. Horses can be seriously injured, perhaps permanently, if they get caught in barbed wire.
  3. Organize the necessary supplies, such as grooming gear, a lead rope, a halter, and buckets/tubs for feed and water. Also make sure you have equipment to clean the paddock/pasture and any other areas the horses will spend their time. Equipment includes a spade or a shovel and a rake if your horse is stabled. When replacing the bedding, you will need either a bucket for transporting the bedding or a wheelbarrow. Buy good quality tools, either new or used, as good equipment works better and lasts longer, making it cheaper in the long run.
  4. Organize your horses' feed. Horses need a lot of food to maintain their body condition. If a horse is underweight, she needs more to put the weight on, if she is overweight, she needs less feed. Know what the horse was fed before you bought it; horse's diets need to be adjusted over a period of several days. Remember that how many oats you give the horse depends a lot on how strenuously she is working. The basic components of a horses diet include:
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    • Forage - Horses eat roughage to keep them warm. When buying hay, look at the quality––you want something that is nutritious but is not going to pass right through the horse. Try to get grassy hay, or an oaten hay. If you do get alfalfa (lucerne) hay, try to get a second or even better a third cut, as the hay will be more stalky and will not be too rich.
    • Concentrate - Horses in a paddock usually will eat grass and will require hay to help keep their body condition. However, some horses require hand feeding every day, twice a day, or every other day depending on the horse. The best mixture of chaffs is alfalfa and oats or wheat. The alfalfa chaff will provide high protein and calcium for your horse, and the wheat will provide a source of bulk food. This is when the horse will eat to stay full but the food does not put on or take away nutrients. This is used when you want to fill a horse up faster without adding heat and energy to the food.[1]
      • Older horses with bad teeth generally should receive a fair amount of chaff too, as they don't have to chew so much and still get the fibre and energy they need. Other than that, this also helps with maintaining a healthy appetite.
      • When feeding your horse chaffs (especially made from alfalfa), first mix in some water and crush it into a gruel. This will help prevent choking.
      • Also, don't feed your horse chaffs right after exercising, or she may choke because of lack of saliva to break down the chaff and make it go down smoothly. So before giving your exercised horse chaff, first let her drink some water and get rehydrated.
    • Supplements - Pellets and grain are good ways to put on weight and maintain it. They are also handy when you require a boost of energy for a show or your horse needs a lift. Boiled grains are best as they help to put weight on and during the colder months help to keep the horse warm. If you don't want to fuss around with boiling them, go for a steamed or crushed variety. Wholegrain needs to be broken prior to consumption, as the grains expand when contact with moisture has been made. If you're new to feeding and want something super easy and cost efficient, go for a Pelleted Mix. There are a lot on the market, and it can be difficult to find the right one for your horse. The best thing to start with is a lucerne pellet or a cool pellet. These feeds are add no additional energy and they provide a range of vitamins and minerals. After a while you can try different products until you find the perfect fit.

Purchasing the horses

  1. Find out which breeds are selling well in your area and beyond. Depending on what your customers want in a horse, you might consider breeding gaited horses, laid-back horses, or competitive horses. Of course, most horses are good in a variety of things. Do more research than you think is necessary––don't simply rely on your own current knowledge. Find out who is selling good stock at the moment, which horses are renowned for which traits, the types of issues you're likely to be faced with in caring for that particular breed of horse, etc. Go and talk to existing breeders for their advice, updates and tours of their facilities. Visit horse sales as an observer to get a feel for purchasing horses and how the auctions work. Go through horse farms for sale to see what is available and the prices being fetched. Doing thorough research will ensure that you're well informed and that you're making the right decision about the breed that you're choosing.
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    • Don't jump into breeding rare, exotic breeds unless you've had experience with them. Start with a breed you know a lot about and have spent time handling.
    • If you choose a very popular horse (such as a Quarter Horse), you will have to compete with more breeders to sell, therefore lowering the prices. However, if your aim is to provide quality in all respects, plot this out as part of your business plan and keep to the plan when purchasing, breeding, caring for and selling these horses, so that you are on track to building a solid, good reputation as a reliable and trusted breeder. In business, provided you are focused, aware of your competitors' moves and consistent in producing quality outcomes, you can usually always provide a better service than other people in the same business.
    • If you want to breed racing horses, this requires an enormous outlay of money and should only be started by someone with excellent, firsthand knowledge of the racing industry or you risk making big and costly mistakes.
  2. Purchase the horses. It doesn't matter which breed you're breeding, but obviously some horses will cost you more, and some horses will sell for more. Before you buy a horse, make sure it's registered, a purebred, and has good bloodlines or ancestry. This means sighting papers and checking contractual clauses confirming the ancestry of each horse you purchase. In terms of how many horses you start with, that should be determined by your research, your land space and your budget. Initially it's probably best to start small and see how it goes rather than over-extending yourself only to find out you can't manage it.
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    • If possible, buy a stallion too so that you can breed your mares for free. Beforehand though, make sure you know how to correctly handle and care for a stallion. If you're not yet ready to own a stallion, that's fine and it's good to recognize your limitations––it's far better to find other solutions initially than to get in over your head. Look for suitable sires in the local area and be sure to have a decent form of horse transportation (which you will need anyway, for vet visits and shows).
    • Research the pedigree of the horse you're interested in. Since a horse's lineage can affect the quality of her breeding outcomes, an in-depth knowledge of pedigrees for that certain breed is necessary. Pedigrees are basically a family-tree for horses, and they should list the dam, the sire, the grand dam and grand sire, and so on. Reputable horse breeders will be able to include this in the terms of sale of your new horses.

Caring for your horses

  1. Care for your horses and keep them in shape. Ride them often, but be careful not to get them hot and sweaty when riding in winter (unless you're in an indoor arena) as your horse could very easily become sick or get a chill.
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    • If you'd like to ride in the wintertime, consider investing in a heated indoor arena. These are also nice places to ride untrained horses, give lessons to children, or ride a horse at a canter for the first time, as if you fall you'll only land on sawdust, and your horse won't be able to run off.

Bringing home your new breeding horses

  1. Sort out an appropriate feeding regime before bringing your new horses to the farm, based initially on what the horses have been used to and then gradually shifting them to your preferred diet for the horses (if necessary). When a new horse comes to an unfamiliar surrounding, it is best to leave her alone for at least a couple of days until she settles in. To help the process along, make up a yummy appetizing treat to ease the transition. This could be a basic chaff and grain mix, or you could go all out and make something original, such as Bran Biscuits or a sweet feed mix. Whatever you choose, don't get into a bad habit of overfeeding, as the horse will be a little stressed to be in a new surrounding, you don't want to upset her stomach and you don't want her to start expecting too much food and putting on weight. If the horse doesn't eat the meal, don't force it. She is in an unfamiliar surrounding and everything is new and different. The water will taste different, the food will smell different, so let her adjust and have the food there just in case she's hungry.
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    • Find out what the horse was fed before you bought her; horse's diets need to be adjusted over a period of several days or more depending on how much it'll be changed. Sudden changes can bring about gas, diarrhea and more serious complications.
  2. Do a safety check of the stable regularly. If you plan on keeping your new horse in a stable either at night, most of the day or even for an hour or two, you'll need to make sure it is safe. Make sure there is a sufficient water source, a large bucket will do if only stabled for a few hours, if stabled at night or all day, invest in a water trough or automatic waterer. Provide adequate bedding such as straw or wood shavings. Keep in mind that the bedding should be an approved horse bedding, as some by-products of woods and timber can be toxic to horses.
    1580736 12 1.jpg

Beginning breeding

  1. Breed your mares to a stallion once it's the correct time to breed. Make sure that your mare(s) are in heat before you try breeding them.
    • A good way of telling if a mare is in heat is to put her in a padded stall with a 'teaser' stallion in the padded stall next to her. If the mare moves her tail to one side and sidles her rump towards the stallion, that means she's probably in heat. However, if she starts lashing out at the stallion, that means she probably is not in heat.
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    • Choose a stud with a good pedigree, good achievements, and good ability. Also, people like purebreds a lot, and also horses with good conformation for what they'll be doing. Seek and accept advice from current horse breeders who have an excellent reputation with other horse breeders; check with your local horse association for more information. Most breeders will be happy to share information, as they're as keen as you to maintain high quality standards and to see more healthy horses.
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    • Breed your mare to a stallion that's similar to the mare. It's been known that if you breed, for example, a very short mare to a very tall stallion; the foal may have deformed lungs, legs, and so forth, and may have to be put down. However, if you breed two horses that look very much alike, you should get foals with no deformities, plus, the foals will look alike! Do a lot of research and advice seeking about the best approaches to breeding. Don't take anything for granted!
      1580736 13b3 1.jpg
  2. Imprint train your new foals. It is critical that you acquaint the foal with humans, as this will make the horse easier to train. A well-trained horse is also more valuable, and will likely be friendlier and easier to work with.
    1580736 14 1.jpg
  3. Continue breeding, training, riding, and selling your horses. Always care for them and be kind––both horses and the customers can sense a confident, kindly and approachable breeder.
    1580736 15 1.jpg
    • Be sure to get involved in showing your horses. The prizes or awards are a vital part of promoting the worth of your horses. Showing of horses is a vast topic in itself, so do lots of research, asking of questions and get involved.

Marketing your horse breeding business

  1. Name your horse farm. Make it something creative, yet sophisticated if possible.
    1580736 16 1.jpg
  2. Make a website for your horse farm. There are quite a few free web hosting places, so you can just use one of those if you don't want to pay a fee. However, now that you're a business, it is not the time to be quibbling over small amounts spent on advertising to bring in more customers. A quality website will make a good impression, something that will set you apart from breeders who can't be bothered spending time with online awareness––people expect to find all the information they're looking for in an easy-to-read and professional website, so give them what they're looking for.
    1580736 17 1.jpg
    • Keep all of your prizes and important information right there where customers can see the accolades and information! Don't hide behind modesty––customers want to know your horses are prize winners.
  3. Promote your business. You should be setting aside some of your budget to advertise your existence, your specialization and your availability as a horse breeder/boarder/trainer. Use Google ads and Facebook ads for online reach. Advertise in relevant horse interest and horse association/club magazines. Ensure that there is a decent sign advertising your business at the front gate. And use every media opportunity in the local press that comes your way!
    1580736 18 1.jpg
    • If you like writing and photography, and have the time, maintaining a blog about your horse farm, along with horse breeding advice, can be an excellent form of outreach that will gain interested followers who might just turn into customers now and then!
  4. Last but not least, enjoy the journey. Breeding horses is hard work but it's rewarding, especially if your life is dedicated to horses. You will find yourself emotionally attached to the horses, to what happens to them and to the business as a whole. Most of all, provided you run a tight budget and keep within your means, you will hopefully find it is a healthy and financially rewarding business as well. You might not make millions but if you're doing what you love and making ends meet plus a little more, then it can be a good earner and as your expertise grows, you can use this expertise to teach, write, advise, etc. as well as breeding the horses.
    1580736 19 1.jpg

Tips

  • Stay realistic. If you're always running at a loss, get financial advice to sort things out quickly––don't let things spiral out of control before seeking help. The worst that can happen is loss of your beloved horses and farm, so you owe it to them to get good financial advice, regularly.
  • If you have excess manure to deal with, consider using or selling it as fertilizer.
  • Try to have fun. Do not let the stress of running a business get in the way of this experience. You get what you sign up for- a lot of work, but also a lot of love!
  • If a horse has won shows before, it'll most likely sell for more.
  • Make sure that you're fit. This is no office job and you'll have to throw yourself into the work physically almost daily.

Warnings

  • Always be careful when handling horses, especially stallions. When near horses, always have on a riding helmet and riding boots. Remember that even if your horse loves you and would never deliberately try to injure you, you need to use the same safety precautions as you would with a strange horse, as anything could happen.
  • Owning animals on a farm is a 24/7 business. Factor this in when taking on the business, as you will find it hard to get away for extended periods of time. Make a good network with other local farmers and do turns in caring for one another's property (it doesn't matter whether they have horses or cows, sheep, pigs, crops, whatever, just so long as you're prepared to farm sit). That way, you can at least help one another out in times of emergency and the occasional short break.
  • Remember that you get what you pay for. Shortcuts in equipment, shelter, food, pasture management, etc. will repay you with reduced quality and poorer outcomes.

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Sources and Citations


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source How to of the Day http://ift.tt/1Uh3MDR

dimanche 30 août 2015

How to Curve a Bowling Ball

You have the straight shot down and now it's time to look like the pros. Learning to throw a curve bowling ball takes a lot of time and practice, but the effort pays off with the new-found confidence you will have after mastering this skill and improving your bowling score.

Steps

Mastering the Technique

  1. Start with the right stance and grip. You want to be several inches from the foul line and preferably at least four steps away from your release. Some people take longer and that's fine -- but at least four steps is ideal. Line your feet up with the arrow on the lane you are aiming for (which will depend on how hefty your curve is).

    • If you have your own ball, you probably know how to grip it. But if you're working with a house ball, you may need to adjust your style. House balls generally have knuckle grips -- you want your fingers (and especially thumb) to come out swiftly, so don't jam them in there. Hold the ball so it aligns straight with your wrist. We'll cover hand positions shortly; it's more important during your swing than before.
  2. Focus your eyes on the target pin. Visualize your swing and the ball hitting the target pin before you throw the ball. Concentrate on how you see the ball going down the lane and where it would strike the pin -- much like you would in pool.

  3. Start your approach like you would a straight shot. Your approach is the same as any standard shot -- the change is in your follow-through, and mostly in your hand. So bring the ball back into the swing position while keeping your palm behind the ball, just as you normally do.

    • Be sure to keep your wrist strong. If you carry too much of the weight on your wrist or twist it back and forth, you could hurt yourself -- or at the very least wear yourself down before your frames are up.
  4. Release the ball at the bottom of your swing, pulling your thumb out before your fingers. The idea behind the hook is at the very end, your fingers are the only thing containing the ball, and they spin it as it releases -- hence why your thumb needs to get out of the way. Here are a few hand position options:

    • The standard way to hook the ball is to place your two fingers and thumb in the three holes as normal. In other words, change nothing.
    • Some people choose to not put their thumb in the ball at all, and instead sort of cup the ball on their palm and/or wrist as they swing the ball back and release it in the follow-through.
    • And yet a few choose to only place one finger (the index finger) in the slot and palm the ball, spinning in the same motion on the release.
  5. Rotate your fingers up along the outside of the ball as you release, directing the ball's spin with your fingers. Continue moving your hand up on your swing to direct the ball down the lane, finishing in a handshake position. Ideally, you want to go from a 7 o'clock position to a 4 o'clock position.

    • Try hard not to subconsciously decelerate your swing in an effort to concentrate on and nail your hook; the same power is still needed. Or if you do, account for the differential; when you resume your normal throw, the hook could be very different.
  6. Learn to control the degree of your curve by varying the ball's position and timing your release. To increase the degree of the curve, release your fingers from the ball more rapidly. Your counterclockwise motion could also be more (or less) drastic.

    • If you're not getting it, isolate the variables and experiment with each one alone. Try starting from a different start spot. Try switching up your footwork. Heck, experiment with different balls. It's possible that your wrist and hand positioning is just fine and there's another element that's mixing it up.

Practicing Your Hook

  1. Use a tennis ball to practice. A great way to practice your hook shot without having to make an embarrassing trip to the bowling alley is to practice with a tennis ball. It'll go straight when you throw it, but when it hits the bounce, it'll veer off to the side -- if you're doing it right, of course!

    • Another option is a pool ball, but the damage potential of nearby objects is a bit more substantial!
  2. Use a bowling ball that is a few pounds lighter than the ball you would normally use as you're learning. A lighter ball allows you to focus on learning the new throwing technique. While you definitely want to get up to your normal ball sooner rather than later, the lighter ball can help you concentrate on what your hands should be doing. Just don't get too used to it!

  3. Think of it like spiraling a football, only upside down. If you have experience spiraling a football, it's the same general principle. Just under-handed! Your fingers move along the side of the ball in much the same way. Just think of throwing a football underhanded, trying to maintain the same spin. It starts cupped in your hand, and the last point of contact is with the tips of your fingers as it spins off.

Choosing the Right Ball

  1. If you're using a house ball, know that it could be very difficult. Those balls at the bowling alley are meant for straight shots; hooking them could require different, more outrageous methodology to get the same, natural hook effect. So if you don't have your own, don't stress! It could be your equipment.

    • The general rule of thumb is that you choose a ball that's 10% of your body weight. If you're 160 pounds, choose a 16-pound ball.[1] That is, if you're of normal health and have no reason why a lighter ball would be more down your (bowling) alley.
  2. Get a ball with a fingertip grip. Certain balls (most house balls) come with knuckle grip, where the holes go down to your second knuckle. But a fingertip grip is much more conducive to throwing a hooked ball -- since your thumb and fingers have to come out, the actions are a lot swifter and smoother.

  3. Get your own ball with a urethane or resin coating. A urethane coverstock on your bowling ball will make your hook shot so much easier; they don't absorb oil from the lane and they provide way more friction than your standard plastic ball (the house ball). Those two things combined set that hook up for success.

    • A resin coating can actually dig into the oil in the lane, upping the chance that you hit exactly where you're aiming for. But they're quite an investment and only for the most serious of bowlers.
  4. If you're considering getting your own ball, ask about RG ratings and coverstock. A ball with a high differential of RG rating will create a really sharp hook. However, you could have a ball with a low differential, so long as it has a matte-finish coverstock to combat lane oil. If you're dealing with a dry lane (at your home alley, that is), consider a stiff or pearl coverstock.

    • So many options! When it doubt, explain your situation to the assistant. As long as you give them all your variables and what you'd like to do, they can find the perfect ball for you.
    • Don't choose a ball drilled to your fingers and with your axis point until you have your hook down. As you get better at it, your hook changes. So wait it out! You want a ball that's all your own when you're at your peak.


Tips

  • Consider using a wrist-support. It'll keep your wrist strong and aligned for the perfect shot.
  • Lane conditions can affect the outcome of your curve--you typically get less curve on highly-conditioned lanes. Some bowling alleys use more conditioner (some type of lubricant), and oil (clean & lubricate) their lanes more frequently, than others. There can even be significantly different lane conditions at the same alley as maintenance machines are computerized to apply different patterns to the lane with the lubricant spray. A few practice throws in your lane should indicate how you need to curve your ball.
  • After learning to throw a curve ball with a lighter-weight ball, apply your technique to your normal custom-fitted bowling ball for best results.

Warnings

  • Do not try to turn or curve the ball using your wrist -- it should stay straight and solid through the swing and release.

Things You'll Need

  • Bowling ball
  • Bowling lane
  • Tennis ball (optional, for practice)
  • Wrist support (optional)

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Sources and Citations



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source How to of the Day http://ift.tt/1MWzY9I

How to Catch a Football

Catching a football is something a lot of people can do, but only a few people can do really well. In order to catch a football consistently, you have to use your hand eye coordination correctly and efficiently. People make it seem easy, but it actual reality, it's not. You have to visualize success from the moment the ball leaves the quarterback's hands to the moment it hits yours. Let's get started!

Steps

Catching a Football with Two Hands

  1. Keep your eyes on the ball at all times. A good way to stay zeroed on the ball is to watch the tip of the ball all the way from the quarterback's hand to yours, especially as you practice. This increases the eye part of hand eye coordination. Every time you take your eyes off the ball you increase your chances of dropping it. If you aren't focused on the ball when it hits you in the hands, catching it becomes pure luck.
    Catch a Football Step 1 Version 2.jpg
  2. Extend your arms toward the ball as the ball approaches, so your hands meet it at the furthest possible point. This makes sure that if the ball isn't thrown directly at your hands, you have more chance of catching it. Extend your arms right before the ball reaches you. Never leave your hands flat.
    Catch a Football Step 2 Version 2.jpg
  3. Cup your hands. You want to cup your hand so there is a slight space between them, so one cupped hand circles the right side of the ball, whilst the other one encompasses the left.
    Catch a Football Step 3 Version 2.jpg
    • If the ball is below the waist, your palms should still face out, but put your pinkies together. If you are running and the ball is thrown high, similarly try to put your pinkies together.
  4. Catch the ball, letting it get about halfway between your hands before clamping down on it with all your fingers. Keep your eyes on the ball the whole time. You should feel a slight pressure and you might even let out a small 'oomph' depending on how well your counterpart throws the ball. This is the hand part of hand eye coordination. If you try to run before you've caught the ball, chances are you'll drop it.
    Catch a Football Step 4 Version 2.jpg
    • If the pass is below the waist, let the ball slide through the inside of your palms about halfway and then clamp down on it.
  5. Tuck the ball away. After you have clamped down on the ball, tuck it under your arm on the opposite side of any defenders. If you want, you can also clutch the football with both hands right near your belly button if you don't need the other hand to keep your balance or stiff-arm a defender.
    Catch a Football Step 5 Version 2.jpg
  6. Visualize the catch and visualize success. Make sure that you see in your mind catching the pass. Under no circumstances think "I'm not going to catch this football" or "I hope the defender doesn't tackle me." Think positively and visualize a successful catch from start to finish.
    Catch a Football Step 6 Version 2.jpg
  7. Finished.
    Catch a Football Step 7 Version 2.jpg

Catching a Football with One Hand

  1. Only attempt the one-handed catch when it's impossible to catch the ball with two hands. In a game, when success is on the line, you should be trying to catch the ball two-handed every single time. Sometimes, however, you won't be able to — maybe the cornerback's arm will be grabbing yours, or maybe the ball will be overthrown. Whatever the situation, think two hands first, one hand second.
    Catch a Football Step 8 Version 2.jpg
  2. Put your outstretched palm in a position to catch the ball. If you can, take your dominant hand, open your palm completely, and begin to follow the movement of the ball with your hand. With just enough hand-eye-coordination, you can begin to do with just by looking at the ball, not looking at your hand at all.
    Catch a Football Step 9 Version 2.jpg
  3. Anticipate the ball by moving your hand back slightly. Right before the ball flies into your hand, move your hand back slightly. This will cushion the impact. By doing this, you're effectively making the ball travel slower as it hits your hand because your hand is traveling backwards as well.
    Catch a Football Step 10 Version 2.jpg
    • Think about it: If you don't move your hand back at impact, the ball is going to bounce off your hand like a tennis ball off of a brick wall. If you do move your hand back, the ball will nestle into your hand like a head onto a pillow. Or at least that's the hope!
  4. Aim to catch the ball with your fingers as much as your palm. Catching the ball only with your palm will make the tucking much harder when you're trying to control the catch. If you catch the ball with both your strong fingers and your palm, it'll be much easier to hold onto the ball as you bring it away from your body towards it.
    Catch a Football Step 11 Version 2.jpg
  5. Quickly bring your hand — and the ball — into a tucked position beside your body. Try to use your body as a stabilizer by quickly tucking the ball against it.
    • Practice makes perfect, especially with one-handed catches. Be sure to practice one-handed catches with a friend by throwing each other the ball. Start off slow and gradually throw the ball faster. It'll be easier to catch slower passes than quicker ones. Once you've mastered the soft-toss, practice with quicker throws. Enjoy!

Video

Tips

  • Have confidence in your ability to catch the ball. If you are thinking, "I can't catch from this angle" or just think about how difficult it is going to be to make the catch, then the chances are you won't catch it. It all starts with believing in your ability to catch the ball no matter what the circumstance.
  • Keep your eyes on the ball at all times. Some people think they are keeping their eyes on the ball and they really aren't. The more focused you are on the ball, the better job you will do of catching it with your hands.
  • Ignore the rest of the world and focus on the ball. There is no sky, no ground, nobody else even exists. The only thing is that ball and your hands.
  • Practice catching the ball on the run.
  • Not all throws are going to be perfect. You need to learn to catch bad passes.
  • Practice, practice, practice. You can't master anything by reading it in a book (or online). You need to get out there and practice.
  • DO NOT catch with your body. That is wrong. It can hurt, it increases your chances of fumbling it, and if you're wearing pads you will drop it a lot. I don't care what you saw Joe Pro doing on TV, because Joe Pro runs a 4.2 40 yard dash and people are more concerned with what he does after he catches the ball. Even so, his coach probably still tells him to catch with his hands.
  • Watch the rotation of the ball. The rotation velocity affects your ability to catch it. The faster the spiral the harder you will have to grip it. If the pass is a wounded duck (the rotation is all over the place because it is an ugly pass) then you will have to adjust your hands to get a good grip when you catch it.
  • And don't push at the ball, let it come to you.
  • Try practicing with a basic football instead of an official one.
  • A drill to encourage catching the ball in your hands: lie on your back and toss the ball in the air above you. Watch the ball all the way into your hands, catch it away from your body and squeeze it for two seconds before you throw it again. For increased dexterity, catch it one handed with each hand.
  • If you're no good at catching a football, start off with a Nerf football. That way if you miss a catch and the ball hits your head, it doesn't hurt nearly as much.
  • Try letting someone guard you.

Warnings

  • Like Jerry Rice adjusting to balls thrown by Joe Montana (right-handed) and Steve Young (lefty). Due to the opposing spin on the ball and other effects, you'll have to adjust accordingly.
  • Unlike the days of Fred Biletnikoff, Stick-Em's or anything that helps you grip and catch the ball better are outlawed. You can use gloves though.

Things You'll Need

  • football
  • more than one person
  • a glove with good grip (optional)

Related wikiHows






source How to of the Day http://ift.tt/1JuhsDk

How to Photograph a Tombstone

Headstones are monuments to our ancestors and a link to both family ties and our history. Many people have an interest in taking photographs of tombstones and a good quality photograph is desirable when you're researching ancestry information or documenting headstones and grave markers. Hopefully, you will find these tips helpful.

Steps

  1. Cemetery.jpg
    Be thoughtful when visiting a cemetery. Before you even set forth on your gravestone photography expedition, spare a thought for cemetery etiquette and do the right thing so that others may enjoy this experience too.
    • Park your car in an appropriate place. It is better to walk a distance than to park in a poorly chosen space.
    • Do not wander around with your equipment if there is a committal or graveside service in progress.
    • If you move any flowers or remembrance items to get your photograph, remember to replace them before leaving.
  2. Class of '09.jpg
    Use quality photography equipment. A good digital camera that has auto-focus, flash, adjustable light settings, and zoom. Optical zoom is best because it allows you to get the most details in an image but it will cost more for such a camera and it is a battery depleting element.[1] The Association for Gravestone Studies recommends a 35mm SLR fitted with a 50-55mm lens or a wide angle 35mm lens for crowded graveyard sites.[2] Have enough memory or take along extra cards if you think you might run out.
    • Prefer a camera with an LCD monitor. This will allow you to check before going home that you have got all of the information you want captured taken clearly. If you can't read the inscription or it's out of focus, you'll know straight away.
  3. Gravestone Winwick.jpg
    Plan for the best lighting. This is the most important step as the fine details of the headstone are what you're keen to capture.
    • Front light. The morning light may be recommended if the headstone is facing east. This is often the case, but not always. West facing gravestones (such as in New England) are best photographed at the middle of the day and north facing stones are best photographed in later afternoon light.[3] It is more difficult to get a good shot if the stone is backlit.
    • Angle of sunlight. Direct lighting may not produce a good result as it can wash out the inscription. Noonday lighting can supply contrast of bright light on the stone surface and darker shadows inside the engraving. An angle of the sun of 30 degree at midday is considered to be the best for lighting.[4] Use shadows to your advantage on worn stones that are difficult to read.
    • Reflecting light. Some photographers have portable reflectors or mirrors for this purpose. You can redirect sunlight by the simple placement of a piece of white board. You can buy an inexpensive folding "science fair display" of corrugated cardboard. Lean it against your tripod or a nearby stone so that it directs the light where you want it. Aluminum foil may also work, but may result in unwanted distortions and glares. You can also use two mirrors to create light over a shadowed headstone.[5] Of course, keep your reflector out of the camera field.
    • Off-camera Flash. For best results on difficult stones, or if you don't want to wait around for the perfect sun angle, use off-camera flash. Typical flash units are bright enough to overpower the sun and give sharp contrast even on worn tombstones. You need a camera, probably with a flash shoe, a flash unit (often called Speedlight or Speedlite), and a wired or wireless triggering mechanism. The Cowboy Studio NPT-04 is an inexpensive radio wireless trigger. You will also need a flash stand or an assistant. Position your flash unit so that the light falls across the face of the tombstone from the side, or slightly above. Set your camera on Manual exposure at a fixed, low ISO value. ISO 100 and f/20 at 1/200 is a good starting point for your exposure. You may have to try some test shots to find what works best with your equipment.
  4. Familiarize yourself with different kinds of surfaces. Be aware that different surfaces photograph differently, some better than others. Shiny metallic surfaces will reflect a lot of light and will require more care to avoid getting nothing more than a blur of sunshine, while dull stone surfaces will often need dampening to help bring out the inscription clearly. Check your photos after taking them to see what adjustments need to be made for the headstone surface.
  5. Graveyard Art.jpg
    Enhance the inscription, if necessary. Don't use anything other than pure clean water. Many gravestone surfaces are porous and fragile, such as granite, marble, sandstone, slate, etc.; part of their charm is also part of their fragility, so be extremely careful when attempting to clean or brighten them up. It's fine to spritz a little water onto the inscription to bring out the inscription more clearly or to clean it. Wipe off the surface of the stone with cotton cloth, natural sponge, or a kitchen towel and leave the engraving damp. Allow the surface to dry a bit, and the damp engraving will appear slightly darker. If you have a very soft brush, you might consider using it on non-flaking gravestone surfaces to remove dust build-up or soil.
    • Do not use shaving cream. It will leave a residue of stearic acid that may stain or actually damage the stone (especially if it's granite or marble). This is considered vandalism.
    • Do not use chalk or charcoal directly on the stone. A memorial marker is not an appropriate place for graffiti; moreover, the pigments used in chalk can stain permanently (as can plaster of Paris). Do not use anything gritty or harsh that could remove any part of the headstone.
    • Be very careful if grave rubbing. First, be aware this can damage old headstones and that it is illegal in some States in the USA and possibly in other places. If it is permissible, do so with great care and avoid doing it on any headstones that appear fragile, very old, and in disrepair. To do a gravestone rubbing, place a very large sheet of clean paper over the face of the stone. Then, using the side of the chalk, very gently create a rubbing that leaves an image of the marker on the paper. Always supervise children who do this and ensure that they are very careful with pressing and standing around the grave site.
  6. Old headstones.jpg
    Take plenty of pictures. Digital cameras free you up to take lots of photographs, some of which won't work out as well as others and some of which simply serve as a record rather than a photo of any beauty. Make use of this ability to take various shots of the headstone from differing angles and distances. Take photographs of the section of the cemetery so that you can document the location of the grave. Take a photograph of the entire cemetery from a distance and of the cemetery sign or entrance to document the name and location of the cemetery.
    • You may need to take several shots of some headstones to get all of an inscription. In this case, the panoramic feature of a camera capable of such an operation or phone such as an iPhone can come in handy. If you have an iPhone, carry it with you.
  7. Cemetery_4545.jpg
    Photograph the tombstone's surroundings as well as the stone itself. Statues can tell a lot about who a person was and how they are remembered. Flowers, plants, and other parts of a stone's environment can also enhance the picture.

Tips

  • Photograph smooth and shiny granite gravestones at an angle to avoid getting a reflection of yourself. You can also wear dark clothing to minimize your reflection.
  • Be aware that many gravestones are not straight due to settling. If you want your photograph to show it as straight, you can try to account for this while taking the photo by slanting the camera, or you can fix it back home with a photo program on your computer.
  • If you know how to work with photographic filters, then use them; otherwise, don't over-complicate the experience.

Warnings

  • Don't use household cleaners on gravestones. Many contain chemicals that have the potential to damage the stones.
  • Don't attempt to power wash or pick off lichen. Doing so can remove the delicate surfaces permanently.
  • If removing weeds and other debris, do so with care. Also, seek permission before tidying up graves that aren't your own family's in origin. There may already be people tending them and they might not appreciate their efforts being moved or changed. Of course, if it's clear that the graveyard hasn't been tended for a long time, your input with a little weed tidying and cherishing will be much appreciated. Watch for poison ivy and other irritating plants.
  • The more flush an inscription, the harder it can be to photograph if it is too dark or too bright.
  • Don't try removing graffiti yourself; this is best left to professionals. However, do alert those responsible for maintaining the graveyard of what you've seen.

Things You'll Need

  • Camera and associated equipment, lighting props
  • Gloves if you want to keep your hands clean when touching headstones (disposables will work)
  • Sunscreen and bug repellent
  • Hat
  • Compass (optional, but helpful)
  • GPS device to record specific locations (optional)
  • Snacks and water (optional)
  • Kneeling pad if you are going to be kneeling for shots a lot
  • Notebook and marker, clean paper and pencil for taking rubbings
  • Relevant information about the graveyard, maps, plans, etc.
  • Paper towels, natural sponge, or cotton cloth for wiping headstones, water for spritzing
  • Garden shears and an empty trash bag for clearing away weeds from headstones.
  • Sensible shoes - you may be walking a lot and may have to deal with hills, tree roots, rocks and uneven ground.

Sources and Citations


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source How to of the Day http://ift.tt/1KV1eB0

How to Deal with a Narcissistic Friend

Dealing with a friend who's a narcissist can be a difficult, frustrating situation. There are two types of narcissists, those who are ma...