mardi 8 mai 2018

How to Store Knives in Your Kitchen

Once you have invested money into a good knife, it's important to consider proper storage methods that will keep your blades both sharp and unscathed for as long as possible. There are various ways to maximize the life of your knives; the best choice depends on both your kitchen space and working area.

EditSteps

EditStoring in a Knife Block

  1. Purchase a countertop knife block for an easy-to-reach option. If you want your blades close at hand and have the counter space to spare, a counter-top knife block is an ideal option for storage. From a standard block that comes with the average knife set to versions with various paint colours and wood stains, there is a knife block to fit the personality of every cook's kitchen.
    Store Knives in Your Kitchen Step 1.jpg
  2. Get a custom knife block if you have uncommonly-sized knives. Know that there are some knife blocks that are diagonally shaped in order to easily slide knives in and out on an angle. This is to keep the blade sharp whilst doing so. [1]
    Store Knives in Your Kitchen Step 2.jpg
    • Consider a slotless block without pre-sized inserts if you own oddly shaped knives. As well, it may be most beneficial to have the opening at the top of the block instead of on the side, for easier access.
    • For those with uncommonly sized knives, there is always the option to purchase a custom knife block that will hold and protect all the knives that you require. [2]
  3. Place your knife block closest to where you will be working. Having the block located in this area of the counter allows for quick and easy access to all of your knives during meal preparation. It also enables you to quickly switch between different blades depending on what it is that needs to be cut.
    Store Knives in Your Kitchen Step 3.jpg
  4. Insert your knives blade-side up. How you place the knives in the block and remove it prior to use will aid in the protection of the blade's sharpness. Be sure to press the back side of the knife against the slot when sliding out the knife, as opposed to the sharp side. [3]
    Store Knives in Your Kitchen Step 4.jpg

EditProtecting in a Drawer

  1. Measure the dimensions of your drawer. Ensure that the dimensions of the drawer insert do not exceed the length and width of your drawer. Otherwise, it will not fit and will be of no use to you.
    Store Knives in Your Kitchen Step 5.jpg
    • Inserts should fit comfortably into the drawer without needing to be forced in. However, they should not fit too loosely, as the insert may shift around and cause the knives to knock along the side of their protective slots. This can cause unnecessary scratching and dulling to the blade.
  2. Select an in-drawer version of a knife block that works best for your kitchen. There are several considerations to think on when deciding which insert will work best for your kitchen, and each of these factor into how well it will function for you. This determines how well it will protect your stored knives.
    Store Knives in Your Kitchen Step 6.jpg
    • Drawer inserts are geared for home cooks and help prevent damaging moisture build up while still protecting your knives’ edges. Moisture damage causes rust and dulling to the blade, shortening the life of the knife and forcing you to replace it sooner. [4]
    • A benefit of drawer inserts is that they keep knives out of the way, yet still easily accessible. However, keep in mind that these inserts typically don’t fit very long, wide, or tall knives, such as a nakiri or cleaver. [5]
  3. Consider under-cabinet knife storage if a drawer insert doesn't work for you. Sometimes, kitchen drawers don't have ample space to hold additional storage units, so you have to think outside of the box.
    Store Knives in Your Kitchen Step 7.jpg
    • This can be in the form of a regular knife block simply stored under the counter. You are able to maintain all of the convenience of a counter-top knife block without the easy-access, as it will be stored out of arm's reach. To remedy this as best as possible, try to place the knife block in a cabinet directly under the space you work most frequently. [6]
    • A storage block with a base fixed into place on the cabinet floor, allowing for the block to rotate a full 360°, is a great alternative to an insert. As with a counter-top knife block, if you have oddly shaped knives, opt for a block without pre-sized slots. As well, keep in mind how much additional space your rotating block will need to turn completely, once fully loaded with knives; this is critical to consider in order to prevent the handles of the blade from banging against the walls of the cabinet and scratching unnecessarily. [7]
  4. Place knives down into the openings gently. This can be done from above rather than slid in on their edge, to ensure that your blades will not damage in the storing process.
    Store Knives in Your Kitchen Step 8.jpg
    • Never double up knives in a single slot. Even if there is not sufficient room to store them all, doing so will cause scratching on the knives, and for the blades to dull.
    • Storing knives in this manner is best for kitchens with either few knives, or sufficient drawer space to hold multiple inserts. [8]

EditSafe-Keeping on a Magnetic Wall Strip

  1. Store your knives on the wall to save counter space. Wall-mounted magnetic strips are a common method of storing kitchen knives. They generally have a strong magnet running along the width whilst surrounded by two slightly raised metal strips running down the center.
    Store Knives in Your Kitchen Step 9.jpg
    • Not only is this option typically inexpensive to purchase and install, it is easy to access while you are cooking and quick to sanitize when needed.
    • This can be one of the best methods to store your kitchen knives. If placed and removed from the strip properly, minimal contact is made with the sharp edge, which prevents dulling. [9]
  2. Keep your kitchen stylish by selecting a strip that disguises the ‘magnet look’. Wooden or stainless steel magnetic strips are a perfect alternative to the magnetic strip look, without losing the functionality of the original design. These are easy to find both online and in any store catering to kitchen needs.
    Store Knives in Your Kitchen Step 10.jpg
    • Some benefits of the wooden design include its easy and seamless mounting and a resilience to blade damage with an occasional light coating of butcher block oil. [10]
    • Likewise, the stainless steel option is not only visually pleasing, but is stain, rust, and corrosion resistant, which assists in retaining its appeal for years to come. [11]
  3. Ensure that the bevelled edge of the blade does not scrape against the metal. This is crucial, as it causes scratching and dulls the edge of your knife. This can be accomplished by being aware of how you place the knife back onto the magnetic strip for storage.
    Store Knives in Your Kitchen Step 11.jpg
    • A foolproof way to ensure this is to place the knife on the strip back-edge first, carefully turning the blade down onto the holder without the sharp edge ever coming into contact with the strip itself. [12]

EditTips

  • Ensure all knives are completely dry after use, prior to putting them away, in order to prevent moisture-induced rust and other damage to the blade. This is particularly important to consider with knives made of carbon or stainless steel. [13]

EditWarnings

  • Beware of storing knives in areas that both children and/or pets can easily access or knock over. This can be dangerous to both the child or pet coming into contact with the knife, as well as those in the house who may step on a knife that has fallen unawares.
  • If you choose to store your knives out in the open (on your countertop or on a magnetic strip on your kitchen wall), ensure that guests you have over will not touch or handle the knives, potentially hurting themselves or others in the process.
  • Do not toss knives into a drawer with other cutlery and kitchenware, as it becomes dangerous to reach into in order to retrieve a knife. As well, exposing the blade of a knife to other objects in the drawer can cause the metal to both scratch and dull, ruining the quality and aesthetic of your knives. [14]

EditSources and Citations


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source How to of the Day https://ift.tt/2IoBXJb

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