mardi 30 avril 2019

How to Run a Marathon

Running a marathon is a remarkable athletic achievement. Whether you're a world-class runner or a beginner, running a marathon is a serious commitment. Training is an essential, long-term process, so give yourself at least 3-6 months to gradually build your endurance, or longer if you're not already in good running shape. Your body will need lots of fuel, so eat a high-carb, high-protein diet, and drink plenty of fluids to stay hydrated. Above all, remain positive, have fun, and be proud of yourself for taking on this intense challenge!

EditSteps

EditDeveloping a Training Program

  1. Begin training at least 16-24 weeks before the marathon. Register for the marathon and start training at least 6 months before race day. Even for experienced athletes, running a marathon requires lots of preparation, and proper training is a key part of injury prevention.[1]
    Run a Marathon Step 1.jpg
    • Keep in mind you should already have experience with long-distance running before attempting a marathon. Marathon training plans generally assume you already run 3 times per week and can run for around at a time.
    • Specific requirements vary by race. In general, you need to be able to run a total of per week and have previously run 5K and 10K races. Some races also have minimum qualifying times.[2]
    • If don’t regularly run long distances, check with your doctor before starting a new exercise routine.
  2. Run 3 training sessions per week with alternating difficulties. There are a variety of marathon training plans, but they share a few basic elements. To increase your stamina gradually and avoid injury, run 3 times per week with a rest day between each session. Do a long distance run just once a week, and focus on speed and pacing on the other days. For instance:[3]
    Run a Marathon Step 2 Version 2.jpg
    • Tuesday: Run a total of 8 alternating 200 m to 400 m intervals at jogging and sprint speeds. Your target intensity for speed day is 80 to 100% of your max heart rate.
    • Thursday: Run at a brisk, mid-tempo pace, starting at in the first week of training. Your target intensity is about 70% of your max heart rate.
    • Saturday: Run a slow-tempo pace, starting at in the first week of training. For long run day, your target intensity is about 60% of your max heart rate.
    • To calculate your max heart rate, subtract your age from 220. Wear a fitness monitor to keep track of your heart rate as you run.[4]
  3. Warm up and cool down before and after your runs. Walk briskly or jog lightly for 5 to 10 minutes to get your body ready for exercise. After a run, walk or jog for another 5 to 10 minutes to ease your body back to a resting state.[5]
    Run a Marathon Step 3.jpg
    • Warming up and cooling down can help prevent injury and leg cramps. Stretching your legs after a run can also help your muscles recover.
  4. Increase your distances by 10% to 20% per week for about 10 weeks. Increasing distances too quickly is a common mistake. Instead, run at each tempo for gradually longer distances. For instance, add to your long day until you can run for .[6]
    Run a Marathon Step 4.jpg
    • If you miss a training session, don’t try to run on back-to-back days. If you miss a week, don’t try to double up your distances the next week.
    • Every month or so, go easy on yourself and run the distances you ran in week 1. Your body will need extra recovery time as you increase the time you spend on your legs.[7]
  5. Enter 5K, 10K, and half-marathon races during training. Running shorter races can help you learn what to expect on an actual race day. Look online for races and incorporate them as long run days in your training program.[8]
    Run a Marathon Step 5.jpg
    • Don’t run more than 3 half-marathons in a 6-month period and don’t run any races within 3 weeks of the marathon.
    • Incorporating shorter events in your program will help you know what to expect on race day. From check-in logistics to adrenaline rushes, races involve variables that you can’t plan for simply by running on your own.
  6. Decrease your distances by 25% to 50% per week in the last 3 weeks. Taper your training sessions toward the end of the program so you’ll be fully recovered and ready for the big day. Marathon training plans are usually at least 16 weeks; your longest run should take place around week 13. Scale down weeks 14 and 15, then do 1 to 2 light 15 to 30-minute runs during week 16.[9]
    Run a Marathon Step 6.jpg
    • For example, if you got to a peak long day run of in week 13, run on long day in week 14, and in week 15.
    • Don’t run the day before the race. Remember to keep your runs light during week 16.

EditFueling Your Body

  1. Refuel with a healthy snack or meal within 15 minutes after a run. To promote muscle recovery, eat right after you’ve finished running. That goes for training sessions and the big race. Go for high-carb or high-protein items, such as fruit, yogurt, whole grain bread, brown rice, legumes, poultry, and fish.[10]
    Run a Marathon Step 7.jpg
    • Never go more than 90 minutes after a run without eating. Your muscles refuel most efficiently soon after strenuous activity.
  2. Maintain a diet packed with complex carbohydrates during training. Healthy, high-carb foods should comprise about 60 to 70% of your diet. For a 2500 calorie diet, that means you should consume 1500 to 1750 calories, or about 375 to 440 grams of carbs per day. Good sources of complex carbs include fruits, veggies, beans, brown rice, and whole grain bread and pasta.[11]
    Run a Marathon Step 8.jpg
    • High-carb options could include a whole grain bagel with egg and cheese for breakfast, a whole grain pasta salad for lunch, pieces of fruit and nuts for snacks, and sides of brown rice and steamed veggies at dinner.
    • Complex carbs supply your muscles with glycogen, which is a substance your body uses to store energy and deliver it to muscles.
  3. Eat at least of protein per day. Go for lean protein sources, such as poultry, fish, and legumes. As a rule of thumb, runners require about 1.5 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight (about 0.7 grams per pound).[12]
    Run a Marathon Step 9.jpg
    • For example, a runner who weighs would need about 4 ounces (119 grams) of protein per day. A serving of chicken breast, a salmon fillet, 1 cup (172 g) of steamed soybeans, and 2 large eggs would meet that daily need.
    • Overlooking protein requirements is a common mistake among runners. Protein is needed for muscle strength and durability. Many protein-rich foods also contain iron, and consuming too little iron leads to muscle fatigue.
  4. Monitor your urine to make sure you’re staying hydrated. As a rule of thumb, try to drink about at least of fluids per day. The exact amount you need to drink depends on a variety of factors, and your urine is the best way to gauge your hydration level. You’re hydrated if it’s light in color, and you’re dehydrated if it’s darker.[13]
    Run a Marathon Step 10.jpg
    • During a run, aim to drink about every 15 to 20 minutes. Never wait until you’re thirsty to drink; if you’re thirsty, you’re already dehydrated.
  5. Consume a healthy meal and of fluids before the race. To hydrate your body on race day, drink of water or a sports drink 2 hours before the race's start time. An hour before the race, eat a 300-calorie, high-carb, low fat meal to boost your energy reserves.[14]
    Run a Marathon Step 11.jpg
    • For example, have a whole grain bagel with peanut butter and a banana or pasta with chicken and zucchini.
    • Be sure to avoid items that might upset your stomach. If, for instance, dairy products give you trouble, steer clear of yogurt, milk, or cheese on race day.

EditRunning a Successful Race

  1. Get plenty of sleep during the week of the marathon. Do your best to sleep for at least 7 to 9 hours of sleep each night leading up to the race. You might be anxious or excited the night before the race and find it hard to sleep. If you get plenty of rest in the days prior, a restless night before the race will have less of an impact.[15]
    Run a Marathon Step 12.jpg
    • Set aside 1 to 2 hours before bed to do a relaxing activity, like reading or listening to soothing music. Do your best to keep your mind off of the race, day-to-day responsibilities, and any other sources of anxiety.
    • Keep your room quiet and dark and, if possible, set the temperature to around .
    • Don’t drink caffeine in the evening, and avoid eating a heavy meal within 3 to 4 hours of going to bed. Before bedtime, have a healthy snack packed with complex carbs, like cheese and whole grain crackers, whole grain cereal, or a banana.
  2. Check the weather forecast and dress appropriately. If it'll be cold, dress in layers that you can remove as necessary. In hot weather, wear breathable, lightweight, and light-colored clothing.[16]
    Run a Marathon Step 13.jpg
    • Go for moisture-wicking fabrics, especially if it's chilly. Avoid fabrics that trap moisture, such as cotton. Trapped moisture in cool weather can give you the chills.
    • If you need to shed layers on the run, wear clothing that you're okay with losing or leaving by the side of the road. It's a good idea to ask loved ones to stand at designated spots in case you need a quick change of clothes or socks.
  3. Pack a runner's belt and bag with your essentials. Assemble energy bars or gels, water, sunscreen, your fitness monitor (if you use one), sunglasses, a change of clothes, and any other necessities the night before so you’re not scrambling on race day. Pack items that you'll need on you during the race, such as the fitness monitor and energy packets, in the belt. Store supplies you'll need before and after the marathon in a bag or backpack.[17]
    Run a Marathon Step 14.jpg
    • If necessary, make arrangements with a friend or relative to hold onto your stuff while you run.
    • Check the marathon website beforehand and make sure bags are allowed. You may only be allowed to store items in a clear plastic bag.
  4. Arrive to the race early and check in as directed. To keep your nerves in control, wake up early and give yourself plenty of time to eat, get to the check-in area, and mentally prepare yourself for the race. Give yourself at least 15 to 30 minutes extra time to account for traffic, trouble parking, or other variables. When you arrive, head to the designated check-in area to register and receive your number.[18]
    Run a Marathon Step 15.jpg
  5. Pace yourself, especially during the first . Your adrenaline levels will spike on race day, and that rush can cause you to push too hard at the start. Use your excitement to stay motivated, but keep it under control. Remain conscious of your pacing, check your heart rate, and hold back in the first half of the race to conserve energy.[19]
    Run a Marathon Step 16.jpg
    • During training, you’ll get a feel for the length of time you can stay on your legs and the pace you need to keep in order to stay in the race. Track your minutes per mile or kilometer closely to stay on target.
    • For the average runner with a goal to finish in 4 hours, the target pace in the first half of a marathon is 8 minutes and 30 seconds (5:16 per km).
  6. Slow your pace toward the end of the race to avoid overexertion. Try to maintain your pace or slow it a bit up to mile 20 (32 km). Then slow down 30 seconds to a minute to push through the last leg. If, for instance, you're aiming for a 4-hour time, try to run at 9 minutes 30 seconds per mile (5:54 per km) from mile 20 (32 km) until the finish line.[20]
    Run a Marathon Step 17.jpg
    • Additionally, make sure you've fueled up with energy bars or gels by the race's midpoint. If you don't eat something until mile 18 (29 km), you'll crash by mile 20 (32 km).
  7. Use positive visualizations to stay motivated. Keep your goal in mind, picture yourself crossing the finish line, and imagine the joy and pride you’ll feel. Channel energy from spectators and use their cheering to push forward. If you feel like you're hitting a wall, stay positive and visualize yourself blasting through it.[21]
    Run a Marathon Step 18.jpg
    • Above all, have fun. Enjoy the challenge, and take pride in the fact that you’re pushing yourself to your limits!

EditVideo

EditTips

  • Know the course you'll run as well as possible, including how many hills it has, how long they are, and how steep they are. That way, you can make sure you're training properly.
  • Always replace your running shoes after you’ve ran in them. Make sure your gear is broken in on race day; never wear brand new shoes to a race.[22]
  • Find out in advance if you’ll need a friend or relative to hold onto your car keys and other belongings while you run.[23]
  • Running with friends or joining a running club can help you stay motivated during training.[24]
  • During a long-distance run, isotonic beverages or sports drinks will replace salts lost in sweat and hydrate you more effectively than water.[25]
  • Find out in advance what kind of drinks and food will be available on the course. You may need to bring your own energy bars or gels, but the race will probably supply water or sports drinks.[26]
  • To avoid chafing, rub petroleum jelly on your thighs, chest, and underarms.[27]
  • Once you finish the marathon, remember to eat a high-carb, high-protein snack or meal within 15 to 30 minutes.[28]

EditWarnings

  • Never ignore or try to push through pain, swelling, redness, or any other signs of injury. To avoid a chronic injury or complications, see a doctor promptly if you experience any concerning symptoms.[29]
  • Remember to build your endurance gradually. If you’re not used to strenuous activity or long-distance running, consult your doctor before you begin training.

EditRelated wikiHows

EditReferences

EditQuick Summary


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source How to of the Day http://bit.ly/2Je4x0f

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How to Roll Up Shirt Sleeves

Rolling up your shirt sleeves is a great way to give your outfit a casual, effortless vibe or cool off when it’s hot outside. Whether you’re going for something classic or trendy, rolling up cuffed shirt sleeves is easy once you know what to do. You can even roll up t-shirt and sweater sleeves and secure them with rubber bands or safety pins so they’re not sliding down your arms all day.

EditSteps

EditClassic Cuffed Shirt Roll

  1. Unbutton all of the buttons on the cuff of your shirt. Depending on the button-up shirt or blouse you’re wearing, there may be 2 or 3 buttons. If there’s a button higher up on the sleeve, unbutton it too.[1]
    Roll Up Shirt Sleeves Step 1 Version 4.jpg
    • Unbuttoning the cuff buttons will prevent your sleeves from being too tight when you roll them up.
  2. Fold the cuff over once. Fold along the line that separates the cuff from the rest of your sleeve. If you’re folding a stiff dress shirt, avoid folding the cuff in half before folding it over since you’ll crease the cuff and have a hard time getting it out later.[2]
    Roll Up Shirt Sleeves Step 2 Version 4.jpg
    • If your shirt’s made of a softer fabric, you can fold the cuff in half before folding it over onto the sleeve to make your roll thinner, depending on your preference.
  3. Fold the cuff over again to start the roll. The cuff should stay in place now, and you should see the beginning of your sleeve roll. Fold carefully to prevent any lumps and wrinkles.[3]
    Roll Up Shirt Sleeves Step 3 Version 4.jpg
  4. Repeat the process until you reach your mid or upper forearm. Avoid stopping before you reach the middle of your forearm or else your roll might be too loose. On the other hand, don’t roll your sleeve up above your elbow or it may look too bulky.[4]
    Roll Up Shirt Sleeves Step 4 Version 4.jpg
  5. Roll up your other sleeve in the same way. Make sure you roll both sleeves up to the same point so they look symmetrical. Also, if you folded the cuff in half before rolling up your first sleeve, do the same on your other sleeve so they match.[5]
    Roll Up Shirt Sleeves Step 5 Version 4.jpg

EditExposed Cuff Roll

  1. Unbutton each button on your sleeve cuff. Avoid leaving them buttoned since it will make your sleeve roll too tight. Make sure you get all of the buttons, including any that are higher up on the sleeve.[6]
    Roll Up Shirt Sleeves Step 6 Version 4.jpg
  2. Fold the cuff all the way up until it’s about above your elbow. It doesn’t need to be precise, but make sure the cuff itself is completely above your elbow and resting on your bicep. Your shirt sleeve should be inside out at this point.[7]
    Roll Up Shirt Sleeves Step 7 Version 4.jpg
    • Your elbow should still be covered by some of the fabric below the cuff. If it isn’t, you may have folded the cuff too high up your arm.
  3. Roll the bottom edge of your sleeve up over the cuff. Don’t cover the cuff completely. You want about of it peeking out of the top of the roll. The bottom of the roll should fall just below your elbow.[8]
    Roll Up Shirt Sleeves Step 8 Version 4.jpg
    • You can leave more or less of the cuff exposed, depending on your preference.
  4. Repeat the process with your other shirt sleeve. Bring the cuff up to the same point as you did on your other sleeve so your sleeves match. Also, make sure the same amount of cuff is poking out of the roll on each side.[9]
    Roll Up Shirt Sleeves Step 9 Version 4.jpg
    • Look at your sleeves in a mirror when you're finished and make adjustments if necessary.

EditT-Shirt Sleeve Roll

  1. Fold up the hem of your t-shirt sleeve. Make the fold along the line that separates the hem from the rest of your sleeve. Depending on how thick your t-shirt is, you may need to hold the hem in place after you fold it up.[10]
    Roll Up Shirt Sleeves Step 10 Version 4.jpg
    • If you’re wearing a t-shirt that doesn’t have hemmed sleeves, just fold the edge of the sleeve up about .
  2. Continue to roll up your sleeve until it’s as long as you want it. Try to make each roll the same width as the hem of your sleeve so the roll lays as flat and evenly as possible.
    Roll Up Shirt Sleeves Step 11 Version 4.jpg
    • The length you make your sleeves is a matter of preference. For big, boxy t-shirts, you may need to roll up the sleeves more than you would for a small, fitted t-shirt.
    • If you’re wearing a t-shirt made out of a thick, stiff fabric, your sleeves might stay up on their own. Otherwise, you may need to secure them in place.
  3. Use a safety pin to hold your sleeve in place if it doesn’t stay rolled up. Start by taking a small safety pin and inserting it through one of the inner layers of the roll. Then, pass the safety pin through your sleeve and close it to hold the roll in place.[11]
    Roll Up Shirt Sleeves Step 12 Version 4.jpg
    • Attach the safety pin to the part of your sleeve that rests over your armpit so it’s hidden.
  4. Try securing the roll with a rubber band if you don’t have a safety pin. To use a rubber band, start by unrolling your t-shirt sleeve to expose the hem. Then, wrap a rubber band over your sleeve and bicep so it’s lined up with the top edge of the hem. Finally, roll your sleeve up as normal. The rubber band will hold your sleeve in place so it doesn’t unroll.[12]
    Roll Up Shirt Sleeves Step 13 Version 4.jpg
    • You can also use a hair tie in place of a rubber band.
    • Make sure the band you use is big enough to not cut off your circulation when you’re wearing it. If it feels uncomfortably tight, look for something bigger.
  5. Do the same thing with your other sleeve. Roll it up to the same point on your arm so your sleeves match. If you used a safety pin or rubber band to secure the roll on your other sleeve, do the same thing on this sleeve.
    Roll Up Shirt Sleeves Step 14.jpg

EditSweater Sleeve Roll

  1. Get 2 rubber bands or hair ties. Look for ones that can fit comfortably around your forearm without cutting off your circulation. Just make sure they’re tight enough to stay in place.[13]
    Roll Up Shirt Sleeves Step 15.jpg
    • If you’re trying to roll up the sleeves on a tight sweater, you may not need rubber bands or hair ties to hold them in place.
  2. Wrap one of the bands over your sweater sleeve and forearm. Position it so it’s slightly lower than the middle of your forearm. Don’t worry if your sweater bunches around the band—it will be hidden.[14]
    Roll Up Shirt Sleeves Step 16.jpg
    • If the band feels too tight, look for something bigger so your arm doesn't end up hurting later on.
  3. Roll the end of your sleeve up over the band. Bring the end of the sleeve up far enough so that the fold lines up with the rubber band underneath it.[15]
    Roll Up Shirt Sleeves Step 17.jpg
    • If the roll is too big, try moving the band closer to your wrist. If it’s too small, move the band higher up on your forearm.
  4. Continue to roll your sleeve up until you’re satisfied with the length. Try to avoid going above your elbow, especially if your sweater is large and thick, or the roll might look too bulky. When you’re finished, the band should hold your sleeve in place so it doesn’t slide down your arm throughout the day.[16]
    Roll Up Shirt Sleeves Step 18.jpg
  5. Repeat the steps with your other sweater sleeve. Position the band at the same point on your forearm so your sleeves are symmetrical. Then, roll up your sleeve to the same point on your arm as you did with the other one so they’re the same length.
    Roll Up Shirt Sleeves Step 19.jpg
    • It might be helpful to look in a mirror to see if both of your sweater sleeves look the same.

EditRelated wikiHows

EditReferences

EditQuick Summary


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source How to of the Day http://bit.ly/2GXsQ0V

How to Celebrate May Day

May Day is celebrated in many different countries on May 1st, and it signifies the transition from spring to summer. It’s a time that neighborhoods and friends can come together to enjoy the warm spring air and fresh flowers. Do some fun May Day activities, like making flower crowns, dancing around a Maypole, or taking a nature hike. Make May Day baskets to gift to your friends and neighbors, or host your own May Day party, complete with hand-delivered invitations, fresh food and drinks, and fun activities.

EditSteps

EditExploring Fun May Day Activities

  1. Decorate a Maypole with ribbons to enjoy dancing around it with friends. This is a fun way to add a little magic to your May Day gathering. Once you have a pole in the ground, tie 6 to 10 strands of ribbon that are each long around the top of the pole. When you’re ready to dance, put on some music, have everyone grab the end of a ribbon and face the same direction, and dance circles around the pole.[1]
    Celebrate May Day Step 1 Version 3.jpg
    • Use either a long, straight branch that is about tall or a similarly sized pole. Either hammer it into the ground or use a Christmas tree stand to hold the pole in place.
    • For little kids, you could also use something like an empty wrapping paper roll to make a mini-Maypole.
    • There are lots of fun ways to braid the ribbons around the Maypole, from the simple plait, the double plait, to the grand chain. You can find instructions online for the steps to these more intricate dances.
  2. Braid a flower crown to make a whimsical decoration for your head. A big part of May Day is celebrating spring turning to summer and the emergence of new blooms. Pick a handful of flowers from your garden and braid them together to make an adornment for your hair.[2]
    Celebrate May Day Step 2 Version 3.jpg
    • If you don’t have a garden, ask a neighbor if you could pick some of their flowers, or stop by a community garden. Make sure to not pick more than you need, though.
  3. Bake a cake with fresh ingredients if you enjoy baking. Remember, May Day is all about spring turning to summer and celebrating all things fresh and alive. Make an angel food cake and top it with diced strawberries, or try making a classic vanilla cake and pair it with blueberries.[3]
    Celebrate May Day Step 3 Version 3.jpg
  4. Plant some spring flowers to celebrate new growth. May 1st is a great time to go outdoors and get your hands in the soil. Plant some new flowers along your walkway, or cultivate a small flower garden that you’ll get to enjoy year after year.[4]
    Celebrate May Day Step 4 Version 3.jpg
    • Plant perennials for flowers that will return each season. Plant annuals for flowers that you can enjoy just for a single season.
  5. Take a long nature walk to enjoy the fresh air. Look up the local nature paths in your community, or find a scenic route along a river or the ocean. Spend an hour or two out in the warm spring air, checking out the flora and fauna that is starting to creep up.[5]
    Celebrate May Day Step 5 Version 3.jpg
    • This is a great activity to do with kids, too. You could even make a nature scavenger hunt where they have to find different things, like moss-covered rocks, acorns, leaves, different kinds of flowers, or animals.
  6. Have a picnic with veggies and seasonal fruits for a delicious snack. If you’re celebrating with friends, spend a pleasant afternoon at a local park chatting, eating, and enjoying the holiday. Pack watermelon, cantaloupe, cherries, strawberries, blueberries, and peaches. Enjoy cucumber, carrots, tomatoes, celery, radishes, and other vegetables along with some tasty dips, like hummus and spinach dip.[6]
    Celebrate May Day Step 6 Version 3.jpg
    • Don’t forget to bring along a blanket, something to drink, and sunscreen!
  7. Burn a bonfire in the evening to celebrate warm weather. The beginning of May signifies the end of dreary spring weather and the start of warmer days. Ending your May Day with a bonfire is a wonderful way to spend some more time outside, celebrating with friends and neighbors.[7]
    Celebrate May Day Step 7 Version 3.jpg
    • Check to make sure you’re following the proper safety precautions and that you’re allowed to burn a bonfire. Some city ordinances require you to notify them of a planned bonfire several days ahead of time.

EditMaking a May Day Basket

  1. Make homemade treats to put into the baskets for a special touch. Small items like cookies or popcorn balls are nice additions to your May Day basket; plus, you can make 1 big batch and use just 2 or 3 treats per basket. This way you can make a lot of baskets to give away, or you can have leftover treats for yourself. You could also put in some fresh fruit, like oranges, clementines, or freshly picked strawberries.[8]
    Celebrate May Day Step 8 Version 3.jpg
    • If you do include fresh fruit, make sure the items are still in good shape and won’t go bad by the time you deliver the baskets.
  2. Create small flower bouquets for a simple, yet beautiful, addition. If you have a garden or access to fresh flowers, trim off a few stalks and tie the stems together with twine to make a simple, fresh bouquet. If you don’t have access to fresh flowers, you could always buy a big bouquet from a florist or from the grocery store, split the bouquet apart, and assemble smaller bunches to use in your baskets.[9]
    Celebrate May Day Step 9 Version 3.jpg
    • Never take flowers from someone else’s yard if you don’t have their permission.
    • Bouquets don’t have to be big to be beautiful. Three or four single flowers put together can be just as attractive as a full bouquet.
  3. Write a short note to put in the basket referencing May Day. If your friends or neighbors don’t celebrate May Day, they may get confused when a random spring basket appears at their home. Remedy this by writing out a note on card stock to put into each basket.
    Celebrate May Day Step 10 Version 3.jpg
    • Have your note read something like, “Happy May Day!” or “A basket of treats to help you celebrate May Day!”
  4. Arrange the basket to prepare it for delivery. The great thing about May Day baskets is that they can be really small and still be nice and meaningful to those who receive them. Find small baskets at the local dollar store, craft store, or even at a used goods store. Place the flowers in the basket so they are sticking out and visible, add the homemade goodies, and prop the handwritten note in the basket so that it is standing up.[10]
    Celebrate May Day Step 11 Version 3.jpg
    • You can get as complex as you want to with your baskets. Keep them simple, or decorate them with ribbon, add more treats, like chocolates or wine, make them bigger, or do whatever else calls to your imagination. There is no right or wrong way!
  5. Deliver the basket to a neighbor to give them a May Day treat. Traditionally, May Day baskets are left on doorsteps or outside of people’s homes, the doorbell is rung, and the giver of the basket runs away. If you’re worried that someone else might come by and steal the basket, then deliver it in person and make sure the intended recipient gets it.[11]
    Celebrate May Day Step 12 Version 3.jpg
    • However you end up delivering the basket is okay—it can be fun to surprise people and leave them guessing who gifted it to them, but it also can be fun to talk with someone and wish them a happy May Day in person.

EditHosting a May Day Party

  1. Make invitations, attach flowers to them, and hand-deliver them. Lilacs, tulips, forsythia, or small succulents are inexpensive options and will make cute invitations. Use card stock to write the party details (time, location, date), then attach it to the flowers with some twine.[12]
    Celebrate May Day Step 13 Version 3.jpg
    • Depending on how often you see your guests, you may need to plan ahead and start handing out invitations a few weeks ahead of time to make sure you have enough time to see everybody.
    • If you can’t hand-deliver the invitations, that is okay! You could always make invitations on floral-themed paper and mail them out to everyone instead. Or, to keep things really simple, just send a text to everyone to let them know the details. It can be as detailed or a simple as you’d like.
  2. Host your friends outdoors if the weather is nice. You can use your own yard if that is accessible to you, or you could plan to have the party at a local park. Have a tablecloth or blanket to put the food on, and ask friends to bring blankets or chairs to sit on.[13]
    Celebrate May Day Step 14 Version 2.jpg
    • If you have to be indoors, brighten the space with fresh flowers. Clear away all the clutter you can, open the blinds to let in any natural sunlight, and enjoy spending time with your friends.
  3. Make overnight sticky buns for a sweet and crunchy treat. Use your slow cooker to let the buns bake overnight, and then host a morning May Day brunch with the buns, coffee, tea, and fresh fruit. Or, if your gathering is later in the day, they’ll make a nice afternoon treat, too.[14]
    Celebrate May Day Step 15 Version 2.jpg
    • Of course, if you don’t want to bake your own sticky buns, you could stop at a bakery to pick some up, too.
  4. Prepare easy snacks, like cheese and crackers and veggies and dips. Make snacks that will be easy to carry outside and that travel well, especially if you’re planning on having a picnic. Cut up several different kinds of cheese, like cheddar, brie, and gouda, and pair them with crackers. Cut up fresh vegetables and serve them with homemade dips.[15]
    Celebrate May Day Step 16.jpg
    • Fresh fruit, muffins, bread, olives, and pickles also make great May Day snacks.
  5. Serve fresh beverages like orange juice or mimosas. Use a hand press or an electric juicer to juice 2 to 4 oranges for each cup of juice you’d like to make. Serve the juice in cute glasses with decorative straws for an extra festive touch. For mimosas, fill a glass 1/4 to 1/2 way full of champagne. Top off the rest of the glass with fresh juice. Add some blueberries or diced strawberries to the glass for a fun garnish.[16]
    Celebrate May Day Step 17.jpg
    • If you have other fruits and an electric juicer, don’t hesitate to mix and match different flavors. Strawberry, banana, pineapple, and other fruits mix with orange juice to make delicious fruity beverages.
    • You could also create a mimosa bar. Provide different kinds of juices, several bottles of champagne, and lots of fresh fruit so people can mix their own favorite drink.
  6. Plan a few festive activities for your guests to enjoy. Decorate a Maypole, braid flower crowns, paint, make May Day baskets, go shopping for flowers and then plant them, or think up something else that you think everyone would like to do. Even if you just spend time together outdoors and play games, that is a great way to celebrate the holiday.
    Celebrate May Day Step 18.jpg
    • If you’re feeling lost and want some input, ask your friends what kinds of activities they’d be interested in. They probably have some great ideas!

EditTips

  • Remember, May Day is a time to enjoy the outdoors and to take a break from the normal workday routine. Do whatever sounds best to you!

EditRelated wikiHows

EditReferences


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source How to of the Day http://bit.ly/2IO8sBj

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