vendredi 31 mars 2017

How to Exercise With Arthritis

Arthritis is an inflammation of the joints. There are over 100 types of arthritis that can affect 1 joint or the whole body. Scientists have found a positive link between arthritis and regular exercise. When performed properly, exercise can decrease pain and increase your range of motion, allowing you to do more during the day. It can even combat fatigue and decrease the risk of osteoporosis. The most important thing to note is that since there are so many types of arthritis, a workout plan should be tailored to your abilities and pain levels. This article will tell you how to exercise with arthritis.

EditSteps

  1. Meet with your doctor to discuss an arthritis exercise routine. The doctor will have specific boundaries for your exercise. For example, weight-lifting or cycling may not be recommended but resistance bands and swimming might work well.
    Exercise With Arthritis Step 1 Version 4.jpg
  2. Begin working out with a physical therapist. These professionals understand your limitations, and they can teach you how to perform the movements correctly to avoid injury. Do 1 to 2 months (4 to 16 sessions) of workouts with the physical therapist, while practicing at home in between, to prepare yourself for exercise routine.
    Exercise With Arthritis Step 2 Version 4.jpg
    • Your physician can recommend or refer you to a physical therapist that regularly works with arthritis patients. Ask your physical therapist to write down activities that you should do, and how to do them in proper form, so you can refer to the guides when you get home.
  3. Plan an exercise regime that includes range-of-motion exercises every day, strength training every other day and cardiovascular (aerobic) exercise every day or every other day. The best arthritis workout programs are moderate and consistent. Avoid strenuous activity or overworking yourself.
    Exercise With Arthritis Step 3 Version 4.jpg
  4. Put moist heat on swollen joints before you work out. Options include a warm shower, a hot pack, a moist towel or a microwaveable grain bag. Apply for 20 minutes, and avoid making the water too hot.
    Exercise With Arthritis Step 4 Version 4.jpg
  5. Begin exercise each day by doing range-of-motion exercise. This includes stretching for flexibility and slow, steady movements of the joints, such as arm circles. Work up to 15 minutes of 1 of a combination of the following exercises:
    Exercise With Arthritis Step 5 Version 4.jpg
    • Do simple stretches on each of your major muscle groups. Move each major joint in a slow circular motion. Move your neck from left to right, and never force a joint. This is the easiest form of range-of-motion exercises, and they are usually prescribed by a physical therapist.
    • Do gentle yoga or tai chi. There are many exercise videos that you can buy and classes you can take that are intended for people with arthritis or other chronic health problems. Look into your town's local lifelong learning classes or rent a few videos from Netflix until you find the program that feels the best.
    • Swim or play golf. These 2 activities require more money and equipment. They may also require alteration. Swimming allows you to move your joints in different ways, in a weightless, no-impact environment. You can buy a snorkel mask to avoid turning your neck or use a swimming belt to keep you afloat. Make sure you have cleared these activities with your doctor before beginning.
  6. Move on to aerobic exercise. Doctors and most governments suggest between 150 and 175 minutes of moderate cardiovascular activity per week, to keep your lungs and heart healthy. The following are popular forms of aerobic exercise for people with arthritis:
    Exercise With Arthritis Step 6 Version 4.jpg
    • Do aqua aerobics or water walking. Community and gym pools provide lanes for people using slow movements and classes that allow you work to your own abilities. Most classes use water weights and swimming belts to reduce impact and improve the quality of muscle movement.
    • Swimming can be considered a range-of-motion, aerobic and resistance exercise. Try to swim for at least 30 minutes, starting slowly and employing a number of different strokes. The crawl stroke, backstroke and sidestroke are popular with arthritis sufferers. Use a snorkel mask during the crawl stroke if you want to avoid turning your neck to breathe.
    • Walk for 20 to 30 minutes at a time. Try to walk as fast as you can without causing pain. Ensure you wear shoes with excellent arch supports and cushioning to decrease the impact of the exercise. If it hurts too much to exercise for 30 minutes in a row, break these walks into 10 minute increments 3 times per day.
    • Ride a bike. Arthritis patients should choose their street or stationary bike carefully. Most arthritis patients prefer recumbent bikes because they allow you to sit with your back straight and lessen the impact on your back and shoulders. Recumbent or cruiser street bikes can also allow you to sit and cycle without leaning forward onto your shoulder and wrist joints.
  7. Start strength-training every other day. Do this on the days when you do not do cardio exercise to avoid muscle exhaustion. The following are popular ways that arthritis patients do their strengthening exercises:
    Exercise With Arthritis Step 7 Version 4.jpg
    • Lift small hand weights. Get a physical therapist's help in establishing a weight routine that targets the right muscles around the joints. People with back problems can lift weights in different directions while laying on the ground. Avoid lifting too much and always ask for instructions before trying exercise machines.
    • Use resistance bands. These bands are available in sports stores, gyms and physical therapist offices. You can shut the band in a door and create a loop to tie around your leg or arm. Always flex your core muscles before performing an exercise. Start with a low number of repetitions and work up as you feel stronger.
    • Do an isometric/isotonic exercise video. Isometric exercises are static, keeping the joint still, while isotonic exercises are dynamic, using a motion to strengthen a muscle. These exercises can usually be done without many props. You can begin by watching the exercise videos at arthritis.org
  8. Stop exercising immediately if you feel excess pressure on your weights. Rest after you are done with your workout and drink plenty of water. Start your exercise regime very slowly and work up in time and intensity as you feel stronger.
    Exercise With Arthritis Step 8 Version 4.jpg


EditTips

  • You should rest and avoid cardiovascular or strength training when your joints are very swollen or you are in extreme pain. Try small range of motion exercises and stretching if it is comfortable.
  • Search online or on community bulletin boards for local arthritis exercise groups. Hospitals, health clubs and arthritis organizations provide a number of weekly support groups. They may include walking clubs, classes or pool sessions.

EditWarnings

  • Avoid high-impact workouts if you suffer from arthritis. Running, jogging and jumping cause stress on the joints that can lead to injury and more pain.

EditThings You'll Need

  • Doctor
  • Physical therapist
  • Local pool
  • Exercise videos
  • Resistance bands or weights
  • Supportive athletic shoes
  • Arthritis support group


EditRelated wikiHows

EditSources and Citations



source How to of the Day http://ift.tt/2noF0mr

How to Reheat Leftover Pasta Without It Separating or Drying Up

Reheated pasta often ends up mushy, dried out, or sitting in a pool of oil. Luckily, these problems can be avoided with simple alterations to the heating process. Learn how to save your leftovers, whether they are plain noodles or an easily-separated cream sauce.

EditSteps

EditReheating Plain Pasta

  1. Boil a pot of water. Pour in enough water to cover the noodles, but don't add them to the pot. Wait until the water comes to a boil.
    Reheat Leftover Pasta Without It Separating or Drying Up Step 1.jpg
    • You may use the methods below instead, but this is the fastest and best option for pasta without sauce.
  2. Transfer the pasta to a metal strainer. Choose a metal strainer or colander that can fit into your pot. Ideally, find one with long handles for easy handling.
    Reheat Leftover Pasta Without It Separating or Drying Up Step 2 Version 2.jpg
  3. Dip the pasta into the boiling water. It only takes about thirty seconds to refresh most pasta. Withdraw the strainer and taste test the noodles. If they are not ready, return them to the water. Withdraw and taste test again every 15 seconds.[1]
    Reheat Leftover Pasta Without It Separating or Drying Up Step 3 Version 2.jpg
    • If your strainer does not have long handles, or if you do not have oven mitts, instead place the strainer in a bowl and pour boiling water over it.

EditIn the Oven

  1. Preheat the oven. Set your oven to 350ºF (175ºC) and wait for it to preheat. This method is gentle on pasta and sauces, but may not be practical for a single serving.
    Reheat Leftover Pasta Without It Separating or Drying Up Step 4 Version 2.jpg
  2. Add the pasta to a baking dish. Spread the pasta across a shallow dish. A deep pile of pasta may heat unevenly.
    Reheat Leftover Pasta Without It Separating or Drying Up Step 5 Version 2.jpg
    • If the pasta is dry, add a splash of milk or extra sauce to keep it moist. This is especially important for lasagna.[2]
  3. Cover with foil and bake. The pasta is usually ready in 20 minutes, but check after 15 just in case. The foil should help trap moisture, slowing the drying process.
    Reheat Leftover Pasta Without It Separating or Drying Up Step 6.jpg
    • Optionally, add a sprinkle of Parmesan under the foil 5 minutes before the pasta is done.[3]
  4. Check the pasta. Stick a metal fork into the center of the pasta dish and wait for 10 to 15 seconds. If the tip of the fork is hot to the touch, the pasta is ready. If not, return the pasta to the oven.[4]
    Reheat Leftover Pasta Without It Separating or Drying Up Step 7 Version 2.jpg

EditOn the Stovetop

  1. Fry most pasta dishes over medium-low heat. This is one of the easiest ways to heat pasta. Just add melted butter or oil to a frying pan, add the pasta, and heat. Stir occasionally.
    Reheat Leftover Pasta Without It Separating or Drying Up Step 8 Version 2.jpg
    • Add more sauce if the pasta looks dry.
  2. Heat cream or wine sauces over low heat. These easily separated sauces should be heated over very low heat. For lower risk of separation, see the cream sauce method below.
    Reheat Leftover Pasta Without It Separating or Drying Up Step 9 Version 2.jpg
  3. Fry lasagna. Cut yourself a slab and toss it on the pan, cut side down. Rotate occasionally, heating each cut side until crispy.[5]
    Reheat Leftover Pasta Without It Separating or Drying Up Step 10.jpg

EditIn the Microwave

  1. Use the microwave for single servings only. Microwaves cook unevenly, especially if the pasta dishes contains cheese or vegetables. When reheating a large portion, use the oven instead for greater control.
    Reheat Leftover Pasta Without It Separating or Drying Up Step 11 Version 2.jpg
    • Avoid using the microwave for cream sauces, wine and butter sauces, or other sauces likely to separate.
  2. Toss the pasta with sauce or oil. If the pasta already includes sauce, just stir it to distribute it evenly. If the pasta is plain, stir in a little sauce or olive oil. This will help keep the pasta moist.
    Reheat Leftover Pasta Without It Separating or Drying Up Step 12 Version 2.jpg
  3. Set the microwave to medium-low power. A full power microwave will likely turn your pasta to mush. Reduce it to 50% power or below.
    Reheat Leftover Pasta Without It Separating or Drying Up Step 13 Version 2.jpg
  4. Cover the pasta. Place the pasta in a microwave-safe container, preferably a round one to avoid uneven heating at corners.[6] Cover it with one of the following two methods:
    Reheat Leftover Pasta Without It Separating or Drying Up Step 14.jpg
    • Cover with plastic wrap, but leave one corner open for steam to escape.[7] This traps heat, warming the pasta more evenly.
    • Cover with a damp paper towel. This steams the pasta as it heats up, adding moisture to dry or sauce-light noodles.
  5. Heat in short bursts. Heat the pasta for about 1 minute, then check on its progress and stir. If necessary, continue heating for 15–30 seconds at a time.
    Reheat Leftover Pasta Without It Separating or Drying Up Step 15.jpg
    • If your microwave does not have a turntable, stop and rotate the dish halfway through.

EditReheating Cream or Wine Sauces

  1. Heat water in the base of a double boiler. This is by far the best method for cream-based sauces, such as Alfredo. The indirect heat ensures a more even, slower cooking method, reducing the chance of separation.
    Reheat Leftover Pasta Without It Separating or Drying Up Step 16.jpg
    • You can make your own double boiler out of two pans, or one pan and a glass, heat-safe bowl.
    • If a double boiler is not an option, use the stovetop method instead, over very low heat.
  2. Place the sauce in the top of the double boiler. If possible, heat the sauce separately, then pour over cold pasta or heat as described above. If the sauce and pasta are well mixed, just add them both to the container. Leave it here until the water begins to simmer.[8]
    Reheat Leftover Pasta Without It Separating or Drying Up Step 17.jpg
    • Reheating the pasta and sauce together shouldn't cause any major problems, but the risk of chewy or mushy noodles is a little higher.
  3. Add cream or milk to cream sauces. A cream sauce separates so easily because it is an "emulsion," or suspension of fat and water. A fresh splash of cream or whole milk helps keep these together, reducing the chance that the sauce becomes an oily mess.[9]
    Reheat Leftover Pasta Without It Separating or Drying Up Step 18.jpg
  4. Add butter or reduced cream to wine sauces. Wine sauces are also emulsions, but the acidity can cause cream to curdle. To avoid these, mix in a little melted butter instead. Another option is reduced cream, meaning cream heated in a separate pan until some of the liquid has evaporated.[10]
    Reheat Leftover Pasta Without It Separating or Drying Up Step 19.jpg
  5. Heat slowly, stirring occasionally. The lower the heat, the less likely your sauce is to separate. Stir gently, to avoid breaking apart the ingredients. Eat while the sauce is hot.
    Reheat Leftover Pasta Without It Separating or Drying Up Step 20.jpg
  6. Add an egg yolk in emergencies. If the sauce "breaks" apart while reheating, take it off the heat and transfer a couple spoonfuls to a bowl. Rapidly whisk an egg yolk into the bowl until smooth, then transfer the mixture back to the sauce.[11]
    Reheat Leftover Pasta Without It Separating or Drying Up Step 21.jpg
    • If you're heating the pasta as well as the sauce, the egg yolk method gets messy. Try a small handful of flour instead, to thicken the sauce and cut the greasiness.
    • If you end up with lumps of cooked egg while whisking, discard that bowlful and try again with less liquid and faster whisking. If the lumps are small, just strain out the lumps and use the remaining liquid.

EditTips

  • If you think you'll have leftovers, cook your pasta a little on the chewy side. If the pasta is already soft or overcooked to begin with, no method of reheating will save the texture.
  • For the best texture and taste, eat the pasta within three days of cooking.[12]
  • Surprisingly, there is some evidence that reheated pasta may cause a smaller rise in blood sugar than fresh-cooked or cold pasta. More research is currently in progress.[13]

EditWarnings

  • Do not eat pasta cooked more than seven days ago, or pasta with an unusual smell.[14]
  • Be careful, as all bowls and containers will be hot when you remove them from the microwave.

EditThings You'll Need

  • Plain pasta:
    • metal colander or strainer
    • oven mitts
    • saucepan
    • stove
  • Oven:
    • baking dish
    • foil
  • Stovetop:
    • Frying pan
    • Butter or oil
  • Cream or wine sauces:
    • Double boiler
    • Stirring utensil
    • Cream or butter
    • Egg yolk or flour (sometimes)
  • Microwave:
    • Microwave safe container
    • Plastic wrap or damp paper towel

EditRelated wikiHows

EditSources and Citations


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source How to of the Day http://ift.tt/2opr2lM

How to Write a Personal Financial Plan

Financial plans are written, organized strategies for maintaining financial health and accomplishing financial goals. Developing a personal financial plan will not only allow you to control your financial situation, but can enhance your quality of life by reducing the uncertainty you feel about money-related issues and future needs.[1] While you may opt to employ a professional financial planner, developing your own financial plan is a perfectly feasible practice. Most financial planning experts recommend following a six-part process to develop a robust plan for the future of your finances.

EditSteps

EditDetermine Your Current Financial Situation

  1. Develop a list of your current assets and liabilities. Assets are things you own that have value, while liabilities are the values of the things you owe.
    Write a Personal Financial Plan Step 1 Version 2.jpg
    • Assets may include cash or cash equivalents, such as checking and savings accounts; personal property, including equity in a home and/or a car; and invested assets, including stocks, bonds, and pensions.
    • Liabilities might include current bills and debts such as car loans, home loans, medical debt, credit card debt, or student loans.
  2. Calculate your current net worth. Total your assets, then subtract your total liabilities from this figure. The resulting number is your current net worth. Your current net worth represents the starting point for your personal financial plan.[2]
    Write a Personal Financial Plan Step 2 Version 2.jpg
    • A positive net worth means that you have more assets than liabilities, a negative net worth means the opposite.
  3. Organize your financial records. Create a filing system of your tax returns, bank account statements, insurance policy information, contracts, receipts, wills, deeds, titles, bills, investment plan statements, retirement account statements, pay stubs, employee benefits statements, mortgages and any other type of document that is related to your financial life.
    Write a Personal Financial Plan Step 3 Version 2.jpg
  4. Track your income and expenditures, or cash flows. Doing so will enable you to more carefully study how you currently spend your money — the habits that have led to your current net worth.[3]
    Write a Personal Financial Plan Step 4 Version 2.jpg

EditDevelop Your Financial Goals

  1. Set short-, intermediate-, and long-term goals. Personal financial planning revolves around goals. Consider what you want your lifestyle to be like in the present, near future and distant future, then create an outline of your goals that is comprehensive enough to cover every facet of your life:
    Write a Personal Financial Plan Step 5 Version 2.jpg
    • You may find that your short-, intermediate-, and long-term goals build upon each other — saving $100 a month, for example, toward a house fund may lead toward your long-term goal of purchasing a home.
  2. Use a "SMART" goal-setting process. Make sure your goals are Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic, and Time-based. Doing so will ensure your goals can move past the "dream" stage into actual implementation.[4]
    Write a Personal Financial Plan Step 6 Version 2.jpg
  3. Think about your financial values. How do you feel about money, and why? Why is money important to you? Answering these questions will help you formulate your financial goals. You may find, for example, that money is important to you because you want to have time and resources to pursue your dream of international travel. Knowing this about yourself will help you develop and prioritize your goals.[5]
    Write a Personal Financial Plan Step 7 Version 2.jpg
  4. Bring your family into the conversation. If you have a partner or a family, make your "personal" financial plan a "family" plan. Doing so will ensure that you share your values and goals with each other and make financial decisions with these shared ideas in mind.[6]
    Write a Personal Financial Plan Step 8 Version 2.jpg
    • You may find that your priorities differ. Engage in careful discussion to reach agreement on compromises that will help you both feel comfortable with your financial future.
    • Recognize that some people are more financially minded than others. Determine who will be in charge of a household budget, or consider ways to provide for each partner's need to feel some degree of control.
  5. Consider all your goals, even if some seem less "financial" than others. A goal of backpacking through Europe, for example, might not initially seem financial, but you'll need to acquire resources to make such a trip possible.
    Write a Personal Financial Plan Step 9 Version 2.jpg
    • Intellectual goals might include furthering your education, participating in leadership retreats, sending your children to college and attending seminars.
    • Think carefully about the ways in which you plan to produce income, whether this involves continuing or advancing in your current line of work or switching careers altogether.
    • Lifestyle goals encompass the things you do for fun and entertainment, as well as the things you feel are necessary to the quality of life for which you aim.
    • Residence goals might include renting, purchasing a home, or relocation.
    • Consider the lifestyle you want when you retire, and set personal financial planning goals that will provide for a retirement that meets your standards.

EditIdentify Alternative Courses of Action

  1. Study the options available to you to meet your financial goals. Generally, your options will resolve into two categories: utilizing existing resources in new ways, or generating new income.[7] For each goal, consider whether you should:
    Write a Personal Financial Plan Step 10 Version 2.jpg
    • Continue the same course of action.
    • Expand your current situation.
    • Change your current situation.
    • Take a new course of action.[8]
  2. Remember that the same goal may be met in a multitude of ways. To save money for that backpacking trip to Europe, for example, you might replace your coffee shop stops with home-brewed coffee and save $20 per week. Alternatively, you might provide child care for a friend one afternoon a week and apply your earnings toward the trip.
    Write a Personal Financial Plan Step 11.jpg
  3. Determine whether one goal will impact another. In addition to identifying alternative courses of action within your financial goals, you should consider how your goals interact. You might consider travel a "lifestyle" goal, for example, but after careful consideration realize that pursuing the educational goal of studying a foreign language will enable you to travel more cheaply — or even pursue a career as a translator or businessperson working in a foreign country.
    Write a Personal Financial Plan Step 12.jpg

EditEvaluate Your Alternatives

  1. Select which strategies you'll employ to complete your financial plan. Take your life situation, personal values, and current economic conditions into account.[9]
    Write a Personal Financial Plan Step 13.jpg
    • Consider how you feel about where you're currently positioned financially versus where your goals would take you in each of the categories you've considered. Do you see particular deficiencies in one area? Perhaps you should give this area special consideration.
    • Remain practical. Step-by-step plans will move you toward your goals without leaving you feeling frustrated or defeated by the scope of your agenda.
  2. Remember that all choices involve opportunity costs. An opportunity cost is what you give up when you make a choice.[10] Saving for that backpacking trip by giving up coffee shop visits might include sacrifices of time, planning, and the conversation you enjoy with your favorite barista.
    Write a Personal Financial Plan Step 14.jpg
  3. Research potential decisions like a scientist. Gather as much research as you can, and carefully evaluate your data. If you are considering an investment, for example, you should pay special attention to the correlation between risk and reward — how risky is the investment, and how much reward will you receive if it is successful? Are the benefits worth the risks?[11]
    Write a Personal Financial Plan Step 15.jpg
  4. Recognize that uncertainty will always be part of the picture.[12] Even once you've carefully completed your research, the parameters of your situation may change. The economy may dip, lowering investment concerns. The new job you opt to pursue may leave you personally or professionally unsatisfied. Do your best and remember that you retain the ability to adjust your decisions later.
    Write a Personal Financial Plan Step 16.jpg

EditCreate and Implement your Financial Action Plan

  1. Look at the big picture. Now that you've developed goals, identified alternatives, and evaluated those alternatives, create a list of the strategies you've identified. Consider your current situation and then start thinking about which goals might be most realistic.
    Write a Personal Financial Plan Step 17.jpg
    • Take your current net worth into account. If your liabilities approach or outweigh your current net assets, you'll want to take steps to change that ratio.
    • While you may opt to focus on developing your net assets, don't forget that paying off debt can be a great investment. Interest charges mean that even paltry debts can become overwhelming over time. Allocating some resources toward debt reduction now may prevent serious problems from developing later.[13]
  2. Decide which goals you'll pursue now. Strive for a balanced approach toward short-, intermediate-, and long-term goals that will enable you to plan for a few months and a few years down the line.
    Write a Personal Financial Plan Step 18.jpg
    • Focus upon incremental growth. By doing so you will create a road map that will take you toward your goals.
    • Be realistic. You won't be able to adopt all the great strategies you've evaluated at once, but selecting a balanced range of goals will help you meet the goals you do choose and grow toward a point when you can take on additional projects.
  3. Develop a budget that incorporates your financial planning goals. You already know your net assets and liabilities from your analysis of your current net worth; set these into a framework that includes the decisions you've made. Then hold yourself accountable for these decisions. If you've committed to spending $80 less per month on coffee and placing that money in a savings account, list that in your budget.
    Write a Personal Financial Plan Step 19.jpg
    • Goals such as obtaining a new job may not fit neatly into a budget, but should be listed in an easy-to-reference location as part of your working financial plan.
  4. Consider hiring a professional financial adviser. You may be fully capable of making financial decisions, but a professional adviser has the advantage of emotional detachment from your financial situation.[14]
    Write a Personal Financial Plan Step 20.jpg

EditReview and Revise Your Financial Plan

  1. Think of your financial plan as a working document. Personal financial planning is a process. Life changes, and you'll need to update your plan over time as your circumstances and goals change.
    Write a Personal Financial Plan Step 21.jpg
  2. Plan to review your financial goals on a regular basis. If you find your life circumstances change quickly (as a college student, for example), you may opt to review these goals every 6 months. If your life tends to be more stable (as an adult empty-nester, for example), you might plan on an annual review.
    Write a Personal Financial Plan Step 22.jpg
  3. Discuss your personal financial plan with your partner. If you're already in a committed relationship, hopefully you've pursued this process as a couple. When making a relationship commitment, financial discussions should be part of the conversation about your values, goals, and plans for reaching those goals.
    Write a Personal Financial Plan Step 23.jpg

EditTips

  • Purchase personal financial planning software for automated help with organizing and writing your financial plan.
  • Educate yourself. Read books, newspaper articles, financial magazines and web journals that focus on finance and economics. Watch the news and speak to people who are experienced in personal financial planning. The more you know about financial matters, the better able you will be to plan for your future financial well-being.
  • Ask for advice from a professional financial planner if you need help deciding among different investment vehicles.

EditWarnings

  • Don't forget to account for 3 percent yearly inflation when calculating figures for your budget and projected expenses.[15]

EditRelated wikiHows

EditSources and Citations


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source How to of the Day http://ift.tt/2ik1OoN

How to Clean a Genuine Leather Sheepskin Rug

Natural sheepskin rugs are very easy to care for, and when washed properly, they can look like new again. If your rug is small and relative...